Interpreting Resources

Interpreting Resources


The Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, Inc. — RID, a national membership organization, plays a leading role in advocating for excellence in the delivery of interpretation and transliteration services between people who use sign language and people who use spoken language. In collaboration with the Deaf community, RID supports our members and encourages the growth of the profession through the establishment of a national standard for qualified sign language interpreters and transliterators, ongoing professional development and adherence to a code of professional conduct.

The Pennsylvania Chapter of RID – PARID — PARID is the state affiliate chapter of RID. All members of RID are required to join a state affiliate. If you are a resident of Pennsylvania, you should also join PARID. The philosophy of PARID is that excellence in the delivery of interpretation services among people who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing and people who are hearing will ensure effective communication. As an affiliate chapter of the professional association for interpreters and transliterators, PARID serves as an essential arena for its members in the pursuit of excellence. It is the mission of PARID to provide state and local forums and an organizational structure for the continued growth and development of the profession of interpretation and transliteration of American Sign Language and English. It is the goal of PARID to promote the profession of interpreting and transliterating American Sign Language and English.

National Association for the Deaf (NAD) — The mission of the National Association of the Deaf is to promote, protect, and preserve the rights and quality of life of deaf and hard of hearing individuals in the United States of America.

A Guide to Closed Captioning Technology — Closed captioning may be defined as transcribed text that runs simultaneously with video. Those who are hard of hearing, deaf, or speak a foreign language can benefit from the use of closed captioning services. The first use of closed captioning occurred in 1976, on Julia Child's PBS show The French Chef. PBS sought approval to use closed captioning on their programming to ensure that their deaf andhard-of-hearing audiences weren't excluded from viewing. Over the years, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has updated rules and regulations regarding closed captioning services. With the arrival of online video services and streaming video, the need for more extensive closed captioning service is great. In 2014, the FCC updated their rules to require that all digital services must provide closed captioning.