Today's News of 2012

Today's News

Today's News of 2012


BU awards more than 500 degrees

Winter Commencement

BU presented 559 students with degrees at winter commencement ceremonies on Friday and Saturday, Dec. 14, and 15, which included 88 graduate students and 471 undergraduate students in the Haas Center for the Arts, Mitrani Hall. At the undergraduate ceremonies, the following top honor graduates, who earned the highest grade point average in each college, were recognized:

  • College of Business: Jessica Rae Milito, North Wales, management major with a concentration in human resources
  • College of Education: Kaitlin Elizabeth Chmielewski, Wilkes-Barre, elementary education major
  • College of Liberal Arts: Shannon Mary Bilder, Danville, dual majors, anthropology and criminal justice
  • College of Science and Technology: James Joseph Redinski, Hanover Township, biology/pre-medical science major with a minor in chemistry

Commencement speakers were Yanhui Pang, associate professor of exceptionality programs, and Edward Pitingolo, associate professor of accounting. #BUClass2012

Student research takes center stage

COST Research Day
Charles Brightbill, who earlier this fall won the Graduate Student Research Award at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine annual meeting, will be among 39 students from the College of Science and Technology showcasing and presenting research on Friday, Dec. 7, in Hartline Science Center. Brightbill, pursuing his master’s in exercise physiology, researched the comparison of physiological and metabolic data between Nintendo Wii free running vs. treadmill running. Poster presentations, which feature research varying from swimming torque to solar energy to astrophysics, begin at 2:30 p.m. in the lobby. Individual talk sessions will begin at 3 p.m. on the ground floor of Hartline Science Center, covering a variety of projects ranging from fitness to frog dwarfism to music therapy for cancer patients.

Podcast: How research brings reality to classroom learning

Podcast Getting a jump-start on a career is enticing to any college student, undergraduate or graduate. Robert Marande, dean of the College of Science and Technology, explains how research provides many beneficial opportunities for students, including a chance to collaborate with faculty working within their own discipline as well as applying what they learn in the classroom to a real-life project — an experience and specified training that’s attractive to a potential employer.  

NCASC hosts inaugural Communication Day

Communication Day BU’s communication studies club, NCASC, recently hosted a Communication Day to help increase the communication skills of students of all majors. The goals of NCASC's various training sessions and presentations on personal and professional development were to help increase the communication skills of students — whether they were underclassmen looking to polish up their public speaking skills or upperclassmen looking for more practice in job interviews.

Session Topics

  • Communicating to Reduce Infections by Jeanette Harris, MS, MSM, MT (ASCAP), CIC, MultiCare Health System
  • Having Trouble Talking to Your Doctor?: How to Effectively Communicate in a Provider-Patient Encounter by Nicole Defenbaugh, Ph.D., Bloomsburg University
  • Mediation in Everyday Interaction by Kelly Tenzek, Ph.D., Bloomsburg University
  • Communication Research in Video Games by Aaron Trammell, Rutgers University
  • How to sell yourself in 30 seconds by Krysta Julius, Bloomsburg University
  • Communication in the Cancer-Recovery Continuum: Decision making in Topic Avoidance by Maria Venetis, Ph.D., Purdue University
  • 21st Century PR @BUnow by Richard Ganahl, Ph.D., Bloomsburg University
  • Communicating Corporate Social Responsibility by Paul Ziek, Ph.D., Pace University
  • Resume Do’s and Don’ts by Jen Raup, Bloomsburg University
  • Listen to the podcast!Social Media Tools Everyone Should Know by Justin McDonald, Bloomsburg University
  • Professional Networking and Social Media by Sunny Lee, Rutgers University
  • Communication Techniques for Acing the Employment Interview First Impression by Janet Bodenman, Ph.D., Bloomsburg University
  • Subvertising by Alyssa Duksta, Melissa Reichard, and Erin O’Connor, Bloomsburg University
  • Communication “Q&A” With Bloomsburg Faculty by Mary Nagy, Ph.D., Kelly Tenzek, Ph.D., Joe Hassert, Ph.D., Angela LaValley, Ph.D., and Jihyun Kim, Ph.D.

Lynda’s in the house

Bloomsburg University faculty, students, and staff now have access to over 1,500 courses and 85,000 individual on line, video tutorials that are designed to improve their skills in the use of common and specialized software applications. The tutorials are presented in very short modules with excellent tables of content so it’s easy to jump right to the section you need to answer your question. You can also use your mobile iOS or Android devices to access the materials. Just go to http://lynda.bloomu.edu and sign in with your Husky ID. Check out the How to use lynda.com video first and you’ll be off and learning in a few minutes.

Top student employees honored

Student Employee of the Year The BU Student Employee of the Year was announced Thursday, Dec. 6, in the Warren Student Services Center. First place winner Leslie Cope, will receive a $500 scholarship from the Bloomsburg University Foundation. The runner up, off-campus student worker Shayna Jackson, will receive a $200 gift card to the University Store. Shown from left are nominator Kate Bauman, TriO Upward Bound, Cope; Jackson, and nominator Rand Whipple from Box of Light Studios. The Student Employee Appreciation Committee consists of Jean Downing, Chris Gay, Karen Hicks, Ranjana Sawhney, Pat Stockalis. The selection is made by a group of five reader, who this year, were: Beth Christian, Nicole Miles, Michele Stout, Edwin Valovage and Tanya Bombicca.

Another successful year for BU's annual Holiday Food Drive

For more than 24 years, faculty and staff Holiday Food Drive has been held to support deserving families and organizations in the region. This year, due to overwhelmingly donations of the faculty and staff members, 11 area families received a full box of various food items and a food gift card. Both the Catawissa and Bloomsburg Food Cupboards also received food items. The Toys for Tots Program donated toys for the children during this event. Thank you for your kindness and generosity during this holiday season.

Who's your most outstanding?

Nominations for the TALE's Outstanding Teaching at Bloomsburg University are being accepted through Friday, Dec. 14, from graduating seniors and students graduating with a master's degree. Awards, sponsored by the Teaching and Learning Enhancement Center, will be given during the May commencement ceremonies. Last year, Nathaniel R. Greene, professor of physics and engineering technology, and Thomas J. Starmack, associate professor of educational studies and secondary education, were selected as BU’s Teaching and Learning Enhancement (TALE) Outstanding Teachers of spring 2012. Greene and Starmack each received a $750 professional development stipend, sponsored by the Bloomsburg University Foundation, and a plaque to recognize his achievement.

Student art showcased at Senior Exit Show

Student Art Exit Show BU will honor graduating seniors majoring in art history and art studio during the Senior Exit Show from Tuesday, Dec. 4, to Friday, Dec. 14, in Haas Gallery of Art. The show will open with a reception on Tuesday, Dec. 4, from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. where the seniors will present their research and art work. This event is free and open to the public.

Research Presentations

  • Marissa Weinger, “The Dangers of Women: Aristotle and Phyllis”
  • Gwen Mottern, “Santos: Reflections of Puerto Rico”
  • Tory Girton, “The Iconography of the Abyss: Dore's illustrations of Inferno”
  • Lee Patton, “Benjamin, Adams and the Aura of Authenticity”

Featured in the exhibit are works by Tory Girton, Autumn Lau, Lee Patton and Rebekah Robbins.

FOCUS ministry visits campus

Bethel Deliverance International BU’s Office of Minority Affairs is hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, Dec. 9, at 10:45 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center. Free breakfast at 10:30 a.m. Come be part of the service! There will be a shuttle bus on a continuous loop to pick up students who live on upper campus from 9:45 to 11 a.m. Contact Marcei Woods at (570) 389-4091 for more information.

Audiology student offers thesis defense

Jared Owens, a student in BU’s Doctorate of Audiology (Au.D.), program will present his thesis defense on, “The effects of preventative ankle taping on postural sway,” on Monday Dec. 3, at 10 a.m. in Centennial Hall 301. The thesis is the culmination of his academic and research experience. Members of the university community are welcome to attend the oral presentation and defense of the thesis study. The thesis is a portion of the academic curriculum for graduate programs. In the Doctorate of Audiology (Au.D.) program, there is a doctoral thesis that all students must complete. In this process, the student starts by proposing a research idea to a committee of faculty members. Once that has been approved, the student conducts research and writes a thesis document. Once that has been completed, the student must orally defend the thesis to the committee.

SAM hosts guest speaker, Domino's entrepreneur

Society for Advancement of Management BU's Society for Advancement of Management had an incredible guest speaker on Monday, Nov. 26, visit campus to share his experiences. Paul Dutton, of Danville, to share his experiences on being a successful entrepreneur. His presentation had a large turnout, and Dutton’s experiences had the whole classroom truly intrigued. He had a rather impressive resume as a member of the U.S. Army and put it all behind him to take a risk. This risk nonetheless has turned him into a very successful member of the Domino’s Pizza franchise. Every member of SAM’s group and all attendees have taken various valuable lessons from Dutton, including fighting for your goals in life, even if those goals involve taking an unimaginable risk. Overall, Dutton stressed fighting for what you believe in and doing whatever possible to make ends meet. In addition, his beliefs in customer service and reliability prove that proper business strategies will set you apart from others. His presence was a valuable asset to SAM’s organization and his stories and accomplishments were extremely beneficial.

Forensics showcases skills at regional tournament

Forensics Team BU’s Forensics Team placed sixth out of nine schools at the 17th annual Morgan State University Speech and Debate Tournament on Nov. 9 to 10 in Baltimore, where BU also won the second-place Sweepstakes Trophy for schools affiliated with Pi Kappa Delta — the National Honorary Speech and Debate Association. The following BU students won individual speaking awards at the Morgan State University Tournament:
  • Chelsea Lucas and John Munchel — first place, Dramatic Duo Interpretation
  • Cortney Fenton — third place, Persuasive Speaking
  • Stephanie Kaminski — fourth place, Informative Speaking
  • Nicholas Foreman — sixth place, Best Speaker Award in Parliamentary Debate

Other BU competitors included Joshua Hooks, Dan Lacca, James Neff, Zach Moore, Samantha Morgan and Betsy Rubio. BU graduate students Jacqueline Bavier and Charles Humphrys served as speech and debate judges at the tournament. Neil Strine, director of the Forensics Team, also accompanied the team and participated as a speech and debate judge. The team will travel next to Lord Fairfax Community College in Middletown, Virginia on Nov. 30 for the Collegiate Forensic Association’s Annual Holiday Tournament. The team, funded by the CGA, meets every Monday at 9 p.m. in Bakeless 202. All interested students are invited join a meeting. No prior experience is necessary.

Effort to rebuild Kidsburg brings community together

Kidsburg Get involved in our fun events or join us on a committee to help rebuild everybody's playground, Kidsburg, in the Bloomsburg Town Park. A centerpiece of the park for more than 20 years drawing families from Bloomsburg and far beyond, Kidsburg was destroyed in last year's flood. Our families have already experienced one summer without Kidsburg and are longing to rebuild their beloved playground quickly and in a way that welcomes everyone to play all together for a long time to come. We are very grateful to the BU faculty and students among the SOLVE Office, Department of Physics & Engineering Technology and Department of Biological and Allied Health Sciences who helped create our Kidsburg-SkatePark Team Float for WHLM's Parade of Lights on Black Friday. The Kidsburg 2.0 committee and the SkatePark of Bloomsburg united for this great event to promote a healthy and active lifestyle for children and their families in our Bloomsburg Town Park. With less than a week to pull all this together, we won second place overall! Together with our other volunteers and sponsors, we would like to thank John Hranitz, professor, John Huckans, professor, Michael L. Kerrick, Drew Shaner, and Jean Downing, of SOLVE.

Gender Studies Minor honors soon-to-be graduate

Gender Studies Minor The Fall 2012 Gender Studies Minor (GSM) Graduation Reception was recently held to honor William Doran, an English major, who will graduate in December with a minor in Gender Studies. Doran received a green graduation cord for commencement. Back (L-R): Faith Warner, Ferda Asya, Christina Francis, Nicole Defenbaugh, Hannah Long, Benjamin McIvor, Eowna Harrison. Front (L-R): Rachel Wagaman, William Doran and Keara Hozella. The purpose of BU's Gender Studies Minor which offers cross-listed courses in sixteen departments across campus, is the study of social, cultural, and historical constructions of gender and its intersections with other constructions such as race, class, nation, and sexuality. The program investigates gender relationships and inequalities in a variety of societal contexts and strives to provide co-curricular experiences to enhance the Gender Studies Minor curriculum and raise awareness about issues of gender.

Student group raises $1,300 for charity

Roongo's Rangers A group of BU students going by the name “Roongo’s Rangers” exceeded their fundraising goals for Ronald McDonald House of Danville’s Camp Dost. The camp, which is open to ill children and their families, is a week-long summer camp at Camp Victory in Millville. Roongo’s Rangers held a number of fundraisers throughout the semester, dedicating their time, energy and connections to reach their goal of $1,000. Fundraisers included appearances at the BU men’s and women’s basketball games, development of an Indiegogo website, and a 50/50 raffle. The team managed to raise a total of $1,600, with $1,300 going to the charity after fees and prizes were deducted. After raising $786 on Indiegogo, the team continued to raise funds, raising an additional $226 in cash donations and $520 through the raffle. Winning the first place 50/50 raffle prize, Anthony Bloom received $260, while the rest of the money will go to Camp Dost. The second place winner, Ryan Gibbard, won Knoebels tickets, Pittsburgh Penguins tickets, and a donated gift card to Rosemarie’s. The Public Relations: Cases and Problems class, taught by Richard Ganahl, consists of 20 junior and senior level mass communications majors; Kimberly Cook, Allyssa Cruz, Erika Gunter, Kathryn Hochgertel, Kate Johnson, Meghan Kish, Keri Lebo, Matthew Marcus, Katherine Mazol, Justin McDonald, Christine McDowell, Justin Miles, Anthony Morales, Jaime Morris, Nnamdi Njoku, Kelly Phillips, Ryan Shea, Sha’Ron Singleton, Stephen Spazante, and Sydney Yarnell.

Student veterans send holiday cheer to deployed soldiers

BU Student Veteran's Association BU’s Student Veterans Association (BUSVA) in conjunction with Army ROTC shipped 110-pounds worth of packages in order to support deployed soldiers. The soldiers are part of the 693rd Sapper Company and the 573rd Clearance Company. Both units are currently deployed to Afghanistan. The packages were sent impart, because holidays for deployed soldiers are a difficult time to be away from family. According to U.S. military records, there are currently 68,000 American troops stationed in Afghanistan. The current timetable has American forces scheduled to leave Afghanistan at the end of 2014. BUSVA hopes these packages can bring some holiday cheer to soldiers down range. BUSVA would also like to thank an employee of the Bloomsburg Post Office for providing a donation towards the cost of shipping the packages.

WISE gets into holiday spirit

WISE Fundraiser WISE (Women Inspiring Strength and Empowerment) recently collected food items and toiletries for the American Red Cross of New Jersey to help with the ongoing Hurricane Sandy Relief Efforts. The campus group collected canned goods, cereals, soups, toothpaste, diapers and much more. WISE is a group of young women on campus who support women’s issues and participate in fundraisers for local organizations, such as Breast Cancer Awareness and Relay for Life. Hurricane Sandy affected 24 states , including the entire eastern seaboard from Florida to Maine and west across the Appalachian Mountains to Michigan and Wisconsin, with particularly severe damage in New Jersey and New York. Its storm surge hit New York City on Oct. 29, flooding streets, tunnels and subway lines and cutting power in and around the city. According to reports, Sandy may have caused between $30 billion and $50 billion in economic losses, including property damage, lost business and extra living expenses. The cost to insurance companies could run as low as $10 billion and as high as $20 billion.

Have a safe and happy holiday season with these safety tips

Holiday Safety Nothing can ruin the holiday spirit faster than becoming the victim of a crime. Unfortunately criminals view the holidays a little differently, for them it is a time of opportunity for thefts and fraud. Here are some crime prevention tips that will help you enjoy the holiday season.
  • Use an inexpensive light timer when you are away and ask a trusted neighbor or family member to pick up your newspapers and mail.
  • Burglars know to look for the hidden door key near the front entrance. Don’t hide spare keys under rocks, in flowerpots, or above door ledges.
  • Be extra cautious about locking doors and windows when you leave your house or apartment, even for a few minutes.
  • Keep gifts out of public view. At home do not display them near a window. While shopping lock them in the trunk.
  • When going to your car have your keys in your hand ready to unlock the door but take a quick look inside the car before entering.
  • Even though you are rushed and thinking about a thousand things, stay alert to your surroundings.
  • After holidays, don’t pile up empty gift boxes from your new computer, DVD player, or stereo receiver on the street for the garbage man. Burglars appreciate knowing that you have new expensive gifts inside for them to steal. Break the boxes down or cut them up to conceal the items better.
  • Never drink and drive.

Have a safe and happy holiday from Bloomsburg University Police!

Effort to rebuild Kidsburg brings community together

Kidsburg Get involved in our fun events or join us on a committee to help rebuild everybody's playground, Kidsburg, in the Bloomsburg Town Park. A centerpiece of the park for more than 20 years drawing families from Bloomsburg and far beyond, Kidsburg was destroyed in last year's flood. Our families have already experienced one summer without Kidsburg and are longing to rebuild their beloved playground quickly and in a way that welcomes everyone to play all together for a long time to come. We are very grateful to the BU faculty and students among the SOLVE Office, Department of Physics & Engineering Technology and Department of Biological and Allied Health Sciences who helped create our Kidsburg-SkatePark Team Float for WHLM's Parade of Lights on Black Friday. The Kidsburg 2.0 committee and the SkatePark of Bloomsburg united for this great event to promote a healthy and active lifestyle for children and their families in our Bloomsburg Town Park. With less than a week to pull all this together, we won second place overall! Together with our other volunteers and sponsors, we would like to thank John Hranitz, professor, John Huckans, professor, Michael L. Kerrick, Drew Shaner, and Jean Downing, of SOLVE.

Presidential Grant Recipients

Strategic Planning
Six projects were announced Thursday, April 12, by President David L. Soltz as recipients of $113,725 in 2012 Presidential Grant Awards as part of the ongoing initiatives of Impact 2015: Building on the Past, Leading for the Future.

  • Ned Greene, professor of physics and engineering technology, and John Holtzman, assistant facilities director for energy and environment — $25,000 for campus-wide energy monitoring and efficiency initiative
  • Tom Fletcher, associate dean of extended programs, Steve Kokoska, director of Honors Program, and Irvin Wright, associate dean of academic achievement — $25,000 for The Educational Pathways Initiative
  • John Hranitz, professor of biological and allied health science — #24,680 for initiation of a Center for Undergraduate Research and Education in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics
  • Heather Feldhaus, chairperson of sociology, social work and criminal justice, and Christopher Podeschi, assistant professor of sociology, social work and criminal justice — $23,915 for the Center for Community Research and Consulting
  • John Polhill, assistant dean of College of Science and Technology, and Jennifer Venditti, assistant professor of biology — $10,000 for Summer STEM Enrichment Program
  • John Huckans, assistant professor for physics and engineering technology — $5,130 for environmental impact assessment of the Bloomsburg WindJET
Trita Parsi

Middle East foreign policy expert visits BU

Trita Parsi Trita Parsi, founder and president of the National Iranian American Council, will discuss President Barack Obama’s diplomacy with Iran on Wednesday, Nov. 28, at 7 p.m. at Bloomsburg University’s Carver Hall, Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium. This event is free and open to the public.

Born in Iran and raised in Sweden, Parsi moved to the United States to study foreign policy at the Johns Hopkins School for Advanced International Studies, where he received his doctoral degree.

In 2002, he founded the National Iranian American Council (NIAC), which attempts to advocate the conflict that developed between the U.S. and Iran after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on New York City, Washington, D.C. and western Pennsylvania. NIAC has emerged as a leader since the attacks by representing the Iranian American voice.

Parsi is the author of two books, “Treacherous Alliance” and “A Single Roll of the Dice: Obama's Diplomacy with Iran,” and is considered an expert on U.S.-Iran relations, Iranian foreign policy and the geopolitics of the Middle East. He has appeared as a guest on CNN, “The Daily Show” with Jon Stewart and many other talk shows, both in Iran and the U.S.

He is the 2010 recipient of the H. Charles Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order. The award recognizes individuals for their innovative ideas, in honor of Grawemeyer, an entrepreneur and industrialist who graduated from the University of Louisville in 1984. @tparsi

Philosophy behind assessment

Steven D. Hales, professor of philosophy, recently published an article on outcomes assessment in The Chronicle of Higher Education entitled "Who's Assessing the Assessors' Assessors?"

Middle East foreign policy expert visits BU

Trita Parsi Trita Parsi, founder and president of the National Iranian American Council, discussed President Barack Obama’s diplomacy with Iran on Nov. 28 to a full campus audience in Kenneth S. Gross Auditorium. Parsi was also featured on WKOK's Roundtable series with Mark Lawrence, where he said he is hopeful the U.S. and Iran someday find a peaceful solution to the stalemate. He said he fully understands something needs to be done to keep Iran from introducing more nuclear weapons, but war is not the answer.

Born in Iran and raised in Sweden, Parsi moved to the U.S. to study foreign policy at the Johns Hopkins School for Advanced International Studies, where he received his doctoral degree. In 2002, he founded the National Iranian American Council (NIAC), which attempts to advocate the conflict that developed between the U.S. and Iran after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on New York City, Washington, D.C. and western Pennsylvania. NIAC has emerged as a leader since the attacks by representing the Iranian American voice.

Parsi is the author of two books, “Treacherous Alliance” and “A Single Roll of the Dice: Obama's Diplomacy with Iran,” and is considered an expert on U.S.-Iran relations, Iranian foreign policy and the geopolitics of the Middle East. He has appeared as a guest on CNN, “The Daily Show” with Jon Stewart and many other talk shows, both in Iran and the U.S. @tparsi

Student profiled in global newsletter

Amber Gore Amber Gore, a senior communications studies major, was recently featured in the GlobalLinks NewsWire for her summer study abroad experience in China during the summer of 2009. In the profile, Gore discussed what it was like being an African-American studying in a foreign country with a distinct culture difference.

“I would say to students who are African American or other races: Don’t be scared,” Gore said in the article. “China’s a once-in-a-lifetime experience. I don’t want anybody to be afraid.” Another BU group will head to China this summer, from June 29 to July 28, 2013.

Chi Theta Pi helps Hurricane Sandy victims

Chi Theta Pi Chi Theta Pi recently coordinated a successful Hurricane Sandy relief project that collected a truckload of water, cleaning supplies, clothing, towels, blankets and plenty of non-perishable items. The sisters were especially touched by some of the stories from the townspeople who came up to support the event. Many shared stories of last year’s Bloomsburg flood and empathized with the struggles they see in New Jersey and New York.

Hurricane Sandy affected 24 states , including the entire eastern seaboard from Florida to Maine and west across the Appalachian Mountains to Michigan and Wisconsin, with particularly severe damage in New Jersey and New York. Its storm surge hit New York City on Oct. 29, flooding streets, tunnels and subway lines and cutting power in and around the city. According to reports, Sandy may have caused between $30 billion and $50 billion in economic losses, including property damage, lost business and extra living expenses. The cost to insurance companies could run as low as $10 billion and as high as $20 billion.

Diversity conference provides connections

Diversity ConferenceMore than 100 high school students with 20 staff from eight school districts recently participated in the 10th high school diversity conference at Bloomsburg University. BUSTED presented the keynote and closing. Diversity workshops included sessions with:

The annual conference is facilitated by SOLVE and the Bloomsburg University/Community Task Force on Racial Equity.

Study Abroad: Don't just study it ... live it

BU is offering a four-week Chinese Language and Culture program in Beijing during the 2013 summer term. Students will be able to earn seven credits in collaboration with the prestigious Institute of Chinese as Second Language of Peking University. The program includes intensive training in Mandarin, cultural studies of China’s economic reform and modern day life in the capital city. A variety of cultural study trips in Beijing, and a full weekend tour of Confucius hometown Qufu and Mountain Taishan in Shandong Province will be part of the program.

Why go?

  • It's a great resume builder — students earn up to 7 academic credits from an intense language and culture program.
  • It's adventurous — students visit cultural and historical sites around one of the world's largest and industrious cities, a full weekend tour of Datong Yungang Caves and Hanqing Monastery in Shanxi Province.

A career track born from study abroad experience

Sarah Halter Sarah Halter ‘12 carried the the American flag as part of the color guard leading the Foreign Students' and Teachers' contingent in the opening ceremony parade for the two-day SDUT Student and Faculty Sports Jamboree in China.

The opening ceremony was reminiscent of an Olympic Opening with bands, drum corps, majorettes and pom-pom girls with different contingents marching in around the track, past a reviewing stand of high university leaders, and into formation on the soccer field.

The Jamboree incorporated interdepartmental track and field competitions for both faculty and students. A large portion of the 35,000-member student body filled the stadium for the two days providing lots of cheering and chanting. The band played loud martial music continually for two days.

Alumnae further connecting BU to China

Kristina Vickery '10 and Sarah Halter '12 are both Bloomsburg University English graduates who are teaching English as a Second Language classes at Shandong University of Technology (SDUT) in Zibo, Shandong, China. Vickery began teaching at SDUT in August of 2010 after completing her bachelor's in English. The two things she likes best about working in China are her students and the awesome food. Halter visited SDUT while a participant in the 2011 faculty-led Study Abroad in China program, which was based in Zibo for four weeks. She followed that experience by completing two semesters of Chinese language at BU and participating in intensive language training at Beijing University in July of 2012, again as a participant in Luo’s faculty-led study abroad summer program.

Jim Pomfret, Ph.D., professor emeritus from the Department of Mathematics, Computer Science, and Statistics is spending eight weeks this fall as a university volunteer working with SDUT computer science students, who are enrolled in a cooperative program with BU’s computer science program. He is helping them prepare for the TOEFL test and introducing them to BU’s culture and procedures.

FOCUS ministry visits campus

Bethel Deliverance International BU’s Office of Minority Affairs is hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, Nov. 11, at 10:45 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center. Free breakfast at 10:30 a.m. Come be part of the service! There will be a shuttle bus on a continuous loop to pick up students who live on upper campus from 9:45 to 11 a.m. Contact Marcei Woods at (570) 389-4091 for more information.

Intramural team advances to national tournament

Intramural Flag FootballBU’s own championship intramural flag football team, Husky Pride, recently won the Region I Flag Football Tournament hosted by Springfield College in Springfield, Mass. By winning the tournament, Husky Pride advances to the National Flag Football Tournament on Jan. 4 to 6, 2013, at the University of Central Florida in Orlando, Fla.

Husky Pride defeated Boston College for the regional championship, 21-20. BU’s crew outscored its opponents 230-59 in the six games it played. In addition, three players were selected to the seven-member All-Tournament Team — Braheem Ford, Jared Sikorski (Tournament MVP) and Kywane Lindsay.

Other team members were Josh Henning, Stephen Rossi, Mike Siwinski (coach), Ricky Bailey, Ryan Stuart, Terrance Jones, Chris Pilla and Aaron Brophy (coach, not pictured).

Keep a lookout for LibQual

In November, Andruss Library will be participating in the LibQual survey — web-based survey lets us measure the service quality of libraries. We participated in LibQual in 2006 & 2009; this follow-up survey will show us how things have changed over the last three years. To let you know how important we take this survey, we’re giving away prizes.

When you fill out the survey, you’ll have the chance to enter into a drawing to win:

  • One $150 Amazon.com gift card
  • One $100 gift certificate to the University Store
  • One $50 gift certificate to the University Store
  • 500 additional pages of free printing
  • Library swag (mugs, pens, T-shirts)

We will be surveying all members of the BU community, so keep a lookout for an email inviting you to complete the survey. If you have questions, contact Katie Yelinek, reference librarian and coordinator of government documents, at kyelinek@bloomu.edu. The survey runs from Monday, Nov. 5, through Wednesday, Nov. 21.

Record support for breast cancer awareness

Breast Cancer 5K Walk/Run With the help of more than 650 volunteers and participants, BU's 10th Annual Breast Cancer 5K Walk/Run recently raised more than $13,000 for the Pennsylvania Breast Cancer Coalition. For the past eight years, the walk has raised an average of $8,000 to $10,000 a year.

Special thanks to the Gold sponsors: DASL, CGA, Alpha Phi Omega, N.s.s.l.h.a, W.I.S.E, Delta Epsilon Beta, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Kappa Sigma, OWLS, Zeta Psi, Donald and Scott Wilson and the University Book Store. Groups that raised the most money were Delta Kappa Epsilon and Alpha Phi Omega.

Community Health Regional Summit to take place on campus

ACTION Health, of Danville, will host a Community Health Regional Summit on Friday, Nov. 16, from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., in KUB Multipurpose A&B to provide an opportunity for healthcare providers, administrators, social service workers, community leaders and community members to enhance their knowledge regarding community health and initiate action to address health needs. It's sponsored by Bloomsburg University, Geisinger Health System, Geisinger-Bloomsburg Hospital, and Geisinger-Shamokin Area Community Hospital.

At the event, findings will be presented from the 2012 Community Health Needs Assessment, which identifies the most prominent health and human service needs in ACTION Health’s five-county service region, which includes Columbia, Montour, Northumberland, Snyder and Union counties. Information regarding local impacts of healthcare reform will also be presented. Three officials from Tripp Umbach — a national research and planning firm with clients that include 50 of the nation’s 100 leading hospitals — will provide the community needs assessment presentation starting at 9:15 a.m. They include Paul O. Umbach, the firm’s founder and president and CEO, who is considered one of the nation’s leading community health researchers and planners. The company has completed community health assessments in more than 200 communities.

Attorney Aryanna Abouzari, who serves as the Affordable Care Act outreach specialist for the United States Department of Health and Human Services in Region III, will provide an Affordable Care Act update starting at 11:15 a.m. The cost of the event is $25 per person, which covers lunch and other refreshments. The deadline for registration is Friday, Nov. 9, and pre-registration is required. The registration brochure can be downloaded here, or by contacting Allison Clark at (570) 214-2304.

Model UN travels to Washington D.C.

Model United Nations Members of the Model United Nations club journeyed to Washington D.C. on Oct. 26 for the National Model United Nations Conference. BU represented Thailand in the Human Rights Council, World Health Organization, General Assembly I, and the International Atomic Energy Agency. The conference was a three-day event in which the delegates from all schools collaborated together to solve the issues for each respective committee.

While at the conference, BU students were also able to reach out to other schools and network with the many other delegates from Canada, Texas, Florida, and many other schools.

The students were also able to develop and practice their public speaking, political, and intellectual skills. The conference was a great opportunity to establish themselves as delegates and get a sense of what it is like to work for the United Nations as a delegate.

While at times the conference tested the delegates, they stuck it out and put in their best work that we have seen at a conference so far. We look forward to attending more conferences in the future. (L-R) Jaimie Hoffman, Danielle Rodriguez, A.S.M. Tuhin, Matt Albertson, Eric Petrozino, Mat Sullivan, Ben Otterbein, Dave Yael, Emma Worrall and Kelly Murray.

Psi Chi initiates new members

Psi Chi BU’s chapter of Psi Chi, the International Honor Society in Psychology, recently initiated three new members — Katherine Colombo, Renee DiAugustine and Rosh Keating. They join current members Ashley Bauer, Jennifer Onisick, Christopher Normile, Hanna Jarsocrak and Carrie Johnson. Also pictured are Kevin Ball, associate professor of psychology, and Jeff Leitzel, assistant professor of psychology.

Founded in 1929, Psi Chi encourages, stimulates, and maintains excellence in scholarship, and advances the science of psychology.

Membership is open to graduate and undergraduate men and women who are making the study of psychology one of their major interests, and who meet the minimum qualifications. Psi Chi is a member of the Association of College Honor Societies and is an affiliate of the American Psychological Association (APA) and the Association for Psychological Science (APS). Psi Chi's sister honor society is Psi Beta, the national honor society in psychology for community and junior colleges.

Arabic Club gets a deeper look at Arab world and U.S. relations

Arabic Club Eleven members of BU’s Arabic Club recently participated in the Model Arab League Regional Model in Washington, D.C., where they developed a deeper understanding of the Arab world and acquired practical leadership skills directly related to the United States and one of the world's most vital regions. In the process, they learned about the most important social, economic, cultural, and political issues facing Arab leaders and ordinary citizens. The students represented the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan and the Kingdom of Morocco. Prior to the conference, they met with the Senior Desk Officer for Jordan at the State Department and the Minister Counselor at the Embassy of Morocco.

Joe Stefani and Julia Layman won Outstanding Delegate Awards for their representation on the Environmental Affairs Council (Jordan), and Robert Nixon won an Outstanding Delegate Award for his representation on the Joint Defense Council (Jordan). The Jordanian Delegation as a whole also won the Honorable Mention Award. A.S.M. T. Tuhin won an Outstanding Delegate Award for his representation on the Political Affairs Council (Morocco). In addition, A.S.M. T. Tuhim was selected Secretary General for the conference for 2013-14 and Robert Nixon was selected Chair for the Join Defense Council for 2013-14.

(L-R) Madalyn K. Goss (political science), A.S.M. Tuhin (political science/finance), Veronica Laudermilch (french), Vanessa Pellechio (mass communications/Middle East Studies minor), Candice Benjamin (math), Joe Stefani (economics). Back (L-R) Corey Deihl (history/Middle East Studies minor), Joseph Schultheis (history/Middle East Studies minor), Jesse Bohrman (history/Middle East Studies minor), Julia Layman (sociology) and Robert Nixon (history/Middle East Studies minor).

McDowell Institute welcomes its first director

Kate Nichols Meet the first director of BU’s McDowell Institute for Teacher Excellence in Positive Behavior Support — Kathryn “Kate” Nichols, who says she was attracted to the position by:
  • The opportunity to work with Tim Knoster, chair of exceptionality programs, whose presentations she attended at national conferences;
  • Bloomsburg’s great reputation for high-quality teacher education;
  • And the chance to create a unique program to help shape future educators.

Nichols says she incorporated Positive Behavior Support practices into her previous positions as behavior specialist with the Starkville (Miss.) School District; clinical director of the Autism Center of Tupelo, Miss.; and project coordinator with the University of Memphis’ RISE Project. The new director earned a bachelor’s degree from Christian Brothers University, Memphis, and a master’s degree, education specialist degree and doctoral degree from the University of Memphis.

The McDowell Institute was established with a $2 million commitment to the BU Foundation by philanthropist Susan McDowell. It is designed to equip educators with strategies, practices and experiences to effectively support the academic, social and emotional growth of all students.

VP of administration and finance to retire, interim named

Claudia Thrush Claudia Thrush, assistant vice president of finance, budget and business services, will serve as the interim vice president of administration and finance following the January 2013 retirement of Richard Rugen, who has served as vice president of administration and finance for the past 10 years. The executive search firm Witt/Keiffer will assist us in hiring a new vice president.

Thrush is a certified public accountant who has been employed by BU for 14 years. During her tenure, she has served as the functional team lead for the SAP financial accounting module implementation and played an integral role in special project initiatives, including the Middle States Steering Committee, Middle States Periodic Review Committee and PASSHE Governmental Accounting Standards Board Statement No. 35 Task Force and Accounting Manual committees. She also has been part of the Strategic Planning and Resource Council, known as SPARC 2, and led the Tuition Waiver Task Force. We thank Rugen for his years of dedicated service to Bloomsburg University and wish him an enjoyable retirement.

Forensics showcases talents in intercollegiate tournament

Forensics Team BU’s Forensics (Speech and Debate) Team recently placed fifth out of nine trams at the at the Collegiate Forensic Association’s Fall Speech and Debate Tournament held at the Gaston Day School in Gastonia, North Carolina on Oct. 12 to 13.

Three students won a total of four individual speaking awards:

  • Dan Clark, team president — third place in poetry, fourth place in impromptu speaking
  • James Neff — third place in impromptu speaking
  • Cortney Fenton — second place in persuasive speaking

This was the first intercollegiate tournament for most of the team, including Neff and Fenton. Other competing members included Zach Moore, Dan Lacca, Sydney Hare, Steph Kaminski, Chelsea Lucas and Joshua Hooks. Charles Humphrys, a graduate student in BU’s Master’s Program in Public Policy and International Affairs, served as a speech and debate judge for the BU team at the tournament.

Harry C. “Neil” Strine IV, director of BU Forensics, also served as a speech and debate judge at the tournament. The team will travel to Morgan State University in Baltimore on Nov. 9 to 10 for the next competition. The team meets Mondays at 9 p.m. in Bakeless 202. Contact Strine if interested in joining the team.

Student researchers showcase summer work

Student Research Students of BU’s Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry recently showcased their summer research results, covering topics from blood clotting to fragrances to gun shot residue analysis.

Research Presentations

  • Brandon BrownInteraction of LSPR with Thrombun as an Inhibitor of Blood Clotting, mentored by Toni Bell.
  • Matthew MieleDetermination of Solid-Liquid and Vapor-Liquid Phase Diagrams of Organic Binary Mixtures using Differential Scanning Calorimetry, mentored by Gregory Zimmeran. Funded by URSCA.
  • Jacob PowellDetermination of the Equivalent Conductance of Lanthanum Chloride Solutions at 25, 50 and 75 degrees Celsius and 0.7 MP, mentored by Gregory Zimmerman. Funded by URSCA.
  • Amanda PritzlaffPercent Composition of Lavandula Augustifulia and the Art of Fine Fragrance, mentored by Toni Bell.
  • Franklin RodemerInfluence of the Oneida #3 Acid Mine Drainage and Passive Limestone Treatment System on Little Tomhicken Creek in Luzerne County – Department Summer Research, mentored by Christopher Hallen. Funded by Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholars Summer Program.
  • Gene TunneyAnalysis of Gun Shot Residue using a Handheld X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (XRF), mentored by Michael Pugh. Funded by Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholars Summer Program.
  • Jessica ViscomiAnalysis of Blood Clot Inhibition by ISPR, mentored by Toni Bell. Funded by Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholars Summer Program.

Faculty gain new perspectives on teaching in higher education

Lilly Conference BU faculty recently attended the Lilly Conference at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, where they spent four days learning “Evidence-Based Learning and Teaching," as well as participated in numerous sessions about teaching in higher education. The faculty who attended will share some of what they learned with colleagues during TALE seminars in the spring 2013 semester. Travel was made possible by the Provost office and Dean of Graduate Studies.

Presentation topics included:

  • But What Can We Do on Monday? Identifying Lessons Learned, Promising Applications, and Test Driving New Cats From the Upcoming 3rd Edition
  • How Research-Based Approaches to Cross-Cultural Teaching Can Inform Our Practice: Findings And Implications From A National Study of Indigenous Teaching
  • Teaching Naked: How Moving Technology Out of Your College Classroom Will Improve Student Learning
  • 5 Transformative Teaching Practices
  • What Happened to Borders and Tower Records? How Universities Remain Relevant
  • Achieving Learning Goals by Design (Instead of by Good Fortune)<.>
  • What Research Tells Us About How People Learn

(L-R) Beverly Natividad, communication studies; Denise Davidson, counseling and college student affairs; Howard Lee, finance; and Mykola Polyuha, languages and cultures.

TRiO Upward Bound hosts annual fall forum

TRiO Upward Bound BU’s TRiO Upward Bound hosted their annual Fall Forum for current Bounders and their parents and guardians. The forum included a variety of breakout sessions specifically designed for prospective first generation college students and their families, including a TRiO alumni panel featuring Jorge Maldonado, Bloomsburg High School ’07, Bloomsburg University ’12, currently working as a federal officer for the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC and Marie Ripa, Mt. Carmel High School ’08, Brown University ’12, current working as a teacher intern for Achievement First Charter School in Brooklyn, N.Y.

Breakout sessions included:

  • Senior Workshop: Where are you now, where do you want to be, what do you need to get there? Presented by Tia Dreckman, assistant director
  • Underclassmen Workshop: Rigorous Curriculum: Why AP matters and other academic truths Presented by Jennifer Cughan, academic coordinator
  • Skill builder Workshop: Am I being professional? Presented by Andrea Obert, graduate assistant, Elementary & Secondary School Counseling
  • Skill builder Workshop: Putting your best Face(book) forward Presented by Katie Stapleton, graduate assistant, Elementary & Secondary School Counseling
  • TRiO Upward Bound: The Big Picture, Parent/Guardian Panel & Alumni Panels, Facilitated by Kate Bauman, director

Alumna participates in international ceremony

Sarah Halter Sarah Halter ‘12 carried the the American flag as part of the color guard leading the Foreign Students' and Teachers' contingent in the opening ceremony parade for the two-day SDUT Student and Faculty Sports Jamboree in China.

The opening ceremony was reminiscent of an Olympic Opening with bands, drum corps, majorettes and pom-pom girls with different contingents marching in around the track, past a reviewing stand of high university leaders, and into formation on the soccer field.

The Jamboree incorporated interdepartmental track and field competitions for both faculty and students. A large portion of the 35,000-member student body filled the stadium for the two days providing lots of cheering and chanting. The band played loud martial music continually for two days.

Alumnae further connecting BU to China

Kristina Vickery '10 and Sarah Halter '12 are both Bloomsburg University English graduates who are teaching English as a Second Language classes at Shandong University of Technology (SDUT) in Zibo, Shandong, China. Vickery began teaching at SDUT in August of 2010 after completing her bachelor's in English. The two things she likes best about working in China are her students and the awesome food. Halter visited SDUT while a participant in the 2011 faculty-led Study Abroad in China program, which was based in Zibo for four weeks. She followed that experience by completing two semesters of Chinese language at BU and participating in intensive language training at Beijing University in July of 2012, again as a participant in Luo’s faculty-led study abroad summer program.

Jim Pomfret, Ph.D., professor emeritus from the Department of Mathematics, Computer Science, and Statistics is spending eight weeks this fall as a university volunteer working with SDUT computer science students, who are enrolled in a cooperative program with BU’s computer science program. He is helping them prepare for the TOEFL test and introducing them to BU’s culture and procedures.

Counseling and College Student Affairs group present at state conference

Counseling and College Student Affairs Faculty and graduate students from the College of Education's Counseling and College Student Affairs program recently presented four sessions over a two-day period at a conference presented by Pennsylvania College Personnel Association in Carlisle, which attracts student affairs professionals and graduate students from across the state.

BU's graduate program prepares students to assume professional leadership roles in student affairs in higher education. Recent graduates are working professionally in colleges and universities such as Gettysburg College, University of Connecticut, Juniata College, Penn State University and James Madison University to name a select few.

Harassment and Discrimination Policy has been revised

After a review process by various university groups, the University Harassment and Discrimination Policy, PRP 6814 has been revised. Students, faculty, and staff members are encouraged to participate in the related educational program “Preventing Sexual Harassment and Discrimination Program,” which is located at training.newmedialearning.com/psh/bloomsburgu. Individuals who need additional information or have questions can contact the Office of Social Equity at (570) 389-4553.
Campus Master Plan

Campus Master Plan: Help shape BU’s future

Have a favorite spot on campus? Have ideas on how to make them even better? How about on-campus places you know can be improved? We want to hear from you!
Planning for BU’s Campus Master Plan is underway, led by Stantec — a professional consulting firm specializing in planning, engineering, architecture, interior design, etc. — with the next step focusing on what our campus community has to say about the future of the campus landscape.

Learn more. Share your thoughts

Campus Master Plan You can check out Bloomsburg Campus Plan 2013 on Facebook and follow #BUCampusPlan on Twitter for the latest and greatest updates and upcoming schedule of events. If you have a thought or idea to share and are not a Facebook or Twitter user, email Mary Prout at mprou3@bloomu.edu.

Husky Ambassadors: Take your BU experience to a new level

Husky Ambassadors If you’re interested in an advanced student leadership and networking experience, then the Husky Ambassadors are for you!

What we do

  • Attend Alumni Events and network with BU Alumni
  • Give open house tours and usher Celebrity Artist Series
  • Develop leadership skills utilized in workplace
  • Participate in community service events

BU’s Husky Ambassadors have begun their Fall Recruitment, which continues through Friday. Nov. 9, by 4 p.m. Applications can be dropped off at the Fenstemaker Alumni House. Contact Nate Conroy at 570-389-4215 for more information or with any questions.

Homecoming

Homecoming 2012: Through your eyes!

Bloomsburg University celebrated homecoming weekend with more than an estimated 1,200 alumni returning to campus to participate in activities held throughout Saturday, Oct. 13, joining close to 10,000 current Huskies unleashing Husky Spirit.

Homecoming Unleashed!

Winners for our Homecoming competitions

Homecoming Queen: Anna DiBerardinis, sponsored by Student Nurses' Association
Homecoming King BryanPoepperling, sponsored by Orientation Workshop Leaders
Banner: Husky Ambassadors
Residence Hall Window Painting

    First Place - Luzerne Hall
    Second Place - North Hall
    Third Place - Montour Hall
    Fourth Place - Columbia Hall

Non-Float Parade Entries

    First Place - BU Players/Alpha Psi Omega
    Second Place - North Hall
    Third Place - Lycoming Hall

Parade Floats

    First Place - Supervisory Roundtable
    Second Place - Delta Epsilon Beta, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Phi Sigma Sigma
    Third Place - Theta Tau Omega, Kappa Sigma
    Fourth Place - Alpha Sigma Tau, Sigma Sigma Sigma, Delta Pi, Beta Sigma Delta

LGBTA Conference presents Ben Singer

Ben Singer, Ph.D., visiting professor at the University Pennsylvania's Gender, Sexuality and Women Studies Department, will present "Alphabet Re-View: Unpacking the Politics of L+G+B+T+" at the Fifth Annual Mid-Atlantic LGBTA Conference, hosted by BU on Saturday, Nov. 3, at 2:30 p.m., McCormick 1303. Singer will discuss the complicated politics of the additive alphabet approach in order to challenge us to realize that when we add letters we take on an obligation to re-view, and re-think, our ways of doing politics, and to re-imagine our political frames, goals, priorities, and ways of thinking. His presentation, which is open free to the public, is sponsored by the Office of Social Equity, the College of Liberal Arts and the LGBTA Commission.

ZIPD: A slice of business life

ZIPD Conference

ZIPD
Where can you find nearly 50 alumni sharing their business expertise and insights with current students? From owners and CEOs to presidents and CFOs, successful alumni return to campus as presenters for the second annual Zeigler Institute for Professional Development (ZIPD) Business Conference on Thursday and Friday, Oct. 11 and 12, in the recently renovated Sutliff Hall. Sessions on topics such as personal branding, professionalism, entrepreneurship, leadership, job interviews and building a career continue today.

ZIPD Business Conference

Join the conversation on Twitter at #ZIPD12

ZIPD provides students with the extra tools and skills needed to discover their true career interests and become successful professionals. Learn more about ZIPD, including a story describing how a current student’s accounting career is getting a head start, thanks to a connection with alumnus Mark Thomas, a partner in KPMG.

Do you like volunteering? Making a difference?

Student United Way
Join the new campus organization, Student United Way. The first membership meeting will be on Monday, Nov. 5, in Bakeless 204 at 2:30 p.m. All students are welcome. If you have any questions contact the Student United Way president at brittinyuw@yahoo.com.

United Way Worldwide is the leadership and support organization for the network of nearly 1,800 community-based United Ways in 45 countries and territories. We envision a world where all individuals and families achieve their human potential through education, income stability and healthy lives. @Bloomu_SUW

Podcast Series: From cell phones to textbooks

Robert Marande Podcast How hard is it to balance the use of cell phones, any technology for that matter, with opening up a textbook to study? Robert Marande, dean of the College of the Science and Technology, answers this quandary, as well as sheds light on how students can better handle the addictive nature of technology. Yes, even texting with a friend relating to coursework or an upcoming mid-term is not considered effective studying, according to Marande.
 

New horizons for PASSHE with Act 132

PASSE Entrepreneurial Forums Chancellor John Cavanaugh visited campus on Tuesday, Oct. 16, to discuss the benefits of the New Higher Education Modernization Law (Act 132). Prior to the enactment of the new legislation, a PASSHE university could market intellectual property created by a PASSHE employee, including faculty and student-workers, using an arrangement with the Penn State Research Foundation to provide technology licensing assistance. Under Act 132 new avenues have been created for the commercialization of products and inventions. Universities are now permitted to enter into license agreements (for the production, distribution and sale of faculty-invented intellectual property) with a company owned by the faculty-inventor or staff-inventor or a company that employs the faculty or staff inventor.

How is this new?

The State Adverse Interest Act previously prohibited any “agreement” between the university and its employees. Act 132 specifically allows economic development agreements between the university and employees. Other agreements between the university and an employee that do not qualify as economic development transactions continue to be prohibited by the State Adverse Interest Act.

Statistical analysis to predict largest possible future flood in Bloomsburg

Reza Noubary BU’s Department of Mathematics Seminar Series presents Reza Noubary, professor of mathematics, computer science and statistics, who will discuss “Hazard Assessment of Bloomsburg Floods” on Tuesday, Oct. 23 at 3:30 p.m. in Hartline G40. Noubary says floods continue to be the most frequent and damaging natural disaster in Pennsylvania, having caused many emergencies both in state and federal levels. In recent years flooding has become a problem of even more concern in areas such as Bloomsburg.

For example, Noubary says the flood of 2011 showed despite all the preparations the extreme floods can occur in this part of Pennsylvania and could result in significant damages. Recognizing this, historical floods are studied and investigated by both experts and the authorities and as a result many lessons are learned and recommendations are made to lower their negative effects. Noubary plans to present a statistical analysis of Bloomsburg floods with a view towards their use in hazard assessment. Some new methods will be introduced and their relevance to hazard assessment of floods will be discussed. The methods will be applied to Bloomsburg historical flood data. His analysis includes estimation of the largest possible future flood in Bloomsburg.

TV host, national columnist visits campus

Keith Boykin Keith Boykin, a commentator for MSNBC, CNBC and CNN, will present “For Colored Boys: Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow Isn’t Enough” at 7 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 22, at the KUB Multicultural Center. Boykin is a host of the BET television show My Two Cents, a New York Times best-selling author of three books, and a frequent political commentator on CNN.

Educated at Dartmouth and Harvard, he attended law school with U.S. Senator Barack Obama and served in the White House as a special assistant to President Bill Clinton. He is a veteran of six political campaigns, including two presidential campaigns, and he was named one of the top instructors when he taught political science at American University in Washington. Boykin’s visit is presented by the LGBTA and Office of Multicultural Affairs.

FOCUS ministry visits campus

Bethel Deliverance International BU’s Office of Minority Affairs is hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, Oct. 21, at 10:45 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center. Free breakfast at 10:30 a.m. Come be part of the service! There will be a shuttle bus to pick up students who live on upper campus from 9:45 to 11 a.m. Contact Marcei Woods at (570) 389-4091 for more information.

Body image expert visits campus

Robyn Silverman Robyn Silverman, an award-winning writer, will present, “Media Masquerade: 10 Ways Media Impacts Girls, Women Body Esteem and Confidence,” on Wednesday, Oct. 17, at 7 p.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center. Silverman is known for her no-nonsense, yet positive approach to helping young people. Her ground-breaking research at Tufts University on young women is the foundation for her new book, “Good Girls Don’t Get Fat: How Weight Obsession Is Messing Up Our Girls & How We Can Help Them Thrive Despite It.” Her visit is sponsored by the Women’s Resource Center.

First Lady Corbett hosts poetry reading

Jerry Wemple, a professor of English, along with students Melanie Simms and David Bauman will take part in The Commonwealth Poetry Reading takes place at noon on Thursday, Oct. 11, in the East Wing Rotunda of the state capital building in Harrisburg. First Lady Susan Corbett is scheduled to introduce the readers. Joining them will be Marjorie Maddox, director of the Creative Writing program at Lock Haven University, and Nathaniel Gadsden, the former poet laureate of Harrisburg. The readings will feature poetry celebrating the places of the Keystone State. Wemple and Maddox co-edited a poetry anthology entitled “Common Wealth: Contemporary Poets on Pennsylvania.”

Wemple, a regional native, has published two collections of poetry. Among his awards are the Naomi Long Madgett Poetry Prize, the Word Journal Chapbook Prize, and a Fellowship in Literature from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts.

Simms is a senior creative writing major who lives in Sunbury. A nontraditional student, Simms has published more than 160 poems in magazines, journals, and newspapers. She is the author of the poetry collection “Waking the Muse.” She is the recipient of numerous awards for poetry including a Sophie Award, A Vermont Writer’s Studio Scholarship, and a finalist in the Richard Savage Award from Bloomsburg University. She served with distinction as Poet Laureate of Perry County.

David Bauman grew up in Lock Haven and now lives in Northumberland. He completed his studies for bachelor's in English and will be awarded his degree in December. His was twice a recipient of the Savage Poetry Award.

Wemple and Maddox will also read at 7 p.m. that evening at the Midtown Scholar Bookstore in Harrisburg. The reading will be recorded for podcast by WITF-FM, the local PBS affiliate.

Activist to discuss Native American justice

Suzan Harjo Suzan Shown Harjo, a poet, journalist and activist for Native American rights and culture, will present “Justice For All; Except for Native American People” at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 10, at the KUB Multicultural Center. Harjo is president of The Morning Star Institute, a non-profit cultural rights and arts advocacy group; served on the Native American Policy Committee for Sen. Barack Obama’s presidential campaign and as an Advisor to the Transition in 2008-2009; and is currently the Guest Curator and General Editor for the National Museum of the American Indian’s upcoming exhibit and publication on Treaties.

Harjo has dedicated her life to help Indigenous people but knew in totality she could do very little; however she did make great strides on issues like gaming and repatriation. Her advice was with negative energy people can make a change, because everyone can do something about something and she suggested that we started by dedicating the work that we do to those who had so much promise but had passed away. When taking on causes we must be aware that enemies we never knew existed will try to stop us and this must be met with courage and eliminating our own vulnerability. Harjo’s visit is presented by the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

Housing policy expert to discuss homelessness

Steve Berg Steve Berg, vice president for programs and policy, National Alliance to End Homelessness, will speak on National Best Practices for Building a Homeless System from the Ground Up, at 9 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 10, in the KUB Multipurpose Room. His talk will be followed by a panel discussion moderated by Theresa Singleton from Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia and Jane Vincent, regional administrator, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, and featuring Martha Hanson, U.S. Department of Agriculture; Ed Geiger, Department of Community and Economic Development; and Bryce Maretzki, Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency.

The program is open to anyone interested in issues associated with homelessness. Berg’s visit is sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts, American Democracy Project, SOLVE Office, and Center for Community Research and Consulting, Columbia Montour County Homeless Task Force, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, First Columbia Bank and Trust, First Keystone Community Bank, and Housing Alliance of Pennsylvania.

Victim's rights advocate to tell her story

Liz Seccuro Liz Seccuro, victim’s rights activist and author, will present “My Story: The Journey from Sexual Assault Victim to Survivor to Activist,” on Tuesday, Oct. 9, at 7 p.m. in the KUB Ballroom. Engaging and wry, Seccuro puts a riveting but hopeful face on the devastating crime of rape and its aftermath without sparing any of the ugly details, so that others may come to “know” her a friend. Seccuro is a victim’s rights advocate and spends time lobbying for important legislation to help support sexual assault victims in the United States. She also founded STARS (Sisters Together Assisting Rape Survivors) to help fund programs assisting rape victims and their families who are seeking justice and looking to heal their mind, body and soul. Her visit is sponsored by the Women’s Resource Center.

A conversation on school budgeting and finances

Thomas Starmack Thomas Starmack’s School Law and Finance class will be hosting a panel discussion on Tuesday, Oct. 9, with a local school superintendent, a business manager, and either a school board member or administrator who will be discussing the budgetary process of school finances with a focus on internal and external factors that impact budgetary decisions. The panel will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. in McCormick 1316 and is open to other classes on a first come first serve basis. There will be approximately 50 seats available.

Starmack, associate professor of educational studies and secondary education, will facilitate the panel with the following structure:

  • The panel will give an overview (45 to 60 minutes) of the PK-12 Budgetary process, including internal and external factors that impact budgetary decisions.
  • The second hour will be Q&A from the audience with Starmack’s students having the first questions, as this is essential to our course objectives.
  • Then the floor will be opened for additional questions.

If you are interested, contact ksw50074@huskies.bloomu.edu with your name, class, and number of students. Once we reach the 50 seat capacity, reservations will be closed.

This is not for students to ask about their chances of getting a job based on school finances, but rather to gain a deeper understanding on the budgetary process and factors that are considered to make difficult and creative budget decisions.

Does diagnostic testing work? BU professor reveals surprising answer

Institute for Culture and Society
Reza Noubary, professor of math, computer science and statistics, will present “Do Diagnostic Tests Do What They Are Supposed To Do?” at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 9, in Andruss Library's Schweiker Room. Noubary will discuss how often do diagnostic tests detect the presence or absence of medical conditions or drug use? In some cases, the answer to this question surprises both doctors and the patients, according to Noubary. The presentation, sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts’ Institute for Culture and Society, is open to the public free of charge. Refreshments will be served.

A conversation on Islam

Engy Abdelkader
Engy Abdelkader, vice president of KARAMAH: Muslim Women Lawyers for Human Rights and legal Fellow with the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding, will present, “Islam: Popular Myths and Misconceptions,” on Monday, Oct. 8, at 7 p.m. in McCormick 1303. Abdelkader, an award-winning attorney and scholar, will also lead a campus workshop on the U.S. Constitution and Shari’ah from 3 to 5 p.m. in McCormick 1316. Her presentation is open free to the public. This is the first of several talks on world religions this academic year. Abdelkader’s visit is sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts, Middle East Studies Minor and Protestant Campus Ministry.

Diversity educator says “Be the Change”

Jessica Pettitt

Jessica Pettitt, who has worked in nearly every area of student affairs before becoming the diversity educator your family warned you about, will be on campus Monday, Oct. 1, for a workshop on “Gender This!” at 4 p.m. in Columbia Hall and a public lecture on “Be the Change” at 7 p.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center. Her visit is sponsored by the Frederick Douglass Institute for Academic Excellence.

Nominated for two years by Campus Activities Magazine for Best Diversity Artist, and Hot Pick for 2011, Pettitt’s programs are direct, customized, and highly interactive. Her workshops, trainings, and keynotes take participants on a journey weaving together politics, theory, current events, and storytelling with large doses of humor reminiscent of George Carlin and Wanda Sykes. Participants will be laughing, and she promises no drum circles, guilty tears, or finger pointing. This will be a highly interactive program that will leave participants with actual action steps to make real change in their lives.

BU recognized as a Phi Kappa Phi Chapter of Merit

The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi — the nation’s oldest and most selective collegiate honor society for all academic disciplines — recently recognized BU's chapter of Phi Kappa Phi as a Chapter of Merit. The award is given to chapters that excel in recognizing and promoting academic excellence in all fields of higher education and engaging the community of scholars in service to others. The Chapter of Merit distinction is a part of the Society’s Chapter Recognition Program, which acknowledged 73 chapters with recognition this year, including 54 as a Chapter of Merit. Thirty-two chapters received chapter recognition in 2011.

“The sharp rise in the number of chapters that have achieved recognition this year is impressive. It shows our chapters aspire to live Phi Kappa Phi's mission to recognize academic excellence, starting on their own campuses,” said Society Executive Director Mary Todd. “Chapter officers are volunteers with a deep commitment to Phi Kappa Phi — they are to be commended for their tireless effort on behalf of students.”

By receiving the Chapter of Merit distinction, the Bloomsburg University chapter is recognized as a thriving organization that meets frequently, holds annual initiations and applies frequently for Phi Kappa Phi’s select scholarships, grants and fellowships.

"The faculty, staff and student members of the Bloomsburg University Phi Kappa Phi chapter were honored to receive a 2012 Phi Kappa Phi Chapter of Merit Award,” said Chapter President Michael C. Hickey. “The chapter's members and officers are proud of the chapter's long and distinguished record of achievements, and we look forward to developing and expanding Phi Kappa Phi’s contributions to the BU campus and community."

Chapters achieving the Chapter of Merit distinction receive:

  • a commendation letter from the Society sent to chapter officers and campus administration
  • special recognition on the Society’s website and publications
  • specially designed logo for use in chapter communications
  • recognition advertisements in local media and educational journals
  • $100 award

Student teaching, clinical work, practicum or internship this fall?

Toy Library Are you taking a course that requires a service learning experience or some other experiential project? Are you engaged in community outreach or volunteer work on your own or with a student club or organization? Located in the SOLVE office, the BU Toy Library is here to support your academic work, professional development, and personal interactions with individuals of all developmental ages and abilities.

The BU Toy Library is the first-of-its-kind play and literacy resource center in Central Pennsylvania. It serves professionals and paraprofessionals within our community as well as BU faculty, staff and students who are engaged in activities such as, but not limited to:

  • volunteer work
  • service learning
  • internship and practicum
  • teaching
  • clinical work

Visit us in SSC 224 to see how we have grown into a play and literacy resource center through the support of several internal and external awards including a Presidential Strategic Planning Grant.

Former neo-Nazi turns away from hate

T.J. Leyden T.J. Leyden, considered one of the nation’s most powerful spokespersons for tolerance, will present, “Turning Away from Hate,” on Thursday, Oct. 4, at 7 p.m. in the KUB Ballroom. After 15 years as a neo-Nazi white supremacist activist and recruiter, Leyden experienced a profound change of heart, turned away from hate and began teaching tolerance. Today he works for the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles as a member of their anti-hate task force and has been featured in Time Magazine, an episode of CBS’s 48 Hours and several episodes of the Gangland series on the History Channel. His visit is sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Affairs, Frederick Douglass Institute for Academic Excellence and Greek Affairs.

Fulbright scholar discusses research

Olivia Kwapong
Olivia A.T. Frimpong Kwapong, a visiting scholar in BU’s political science department, will present, “Gendered Factors for Literacy Education,” on Thursday, Oct. 4 at 7 p.m. in McCormick 2303. She will discuss the driving forces for women in a developing African country. Kwapong’s research and teaching interests have been enriched through knowledge-sharing with the academic and public policy communities in Ghana and internationally. Her teaching, research, outreach and publications have focused on education of women, urbanization, governance and the use of information technology for women’s empowerment and poverty reduction. Her presentation, including following reception, is sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts and Phi Kappa Phi.

Campus joins EPA air testing system

RedNet Air Monitoring System
Bloomsburg University has been selected by the state and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to close the gap in the state’s radioactive air monitoring system. A RedNet Air Monitoring System was installed on top of the Andruss Library on Oct. 11. The station uses air filters collected and sent to the EPA by BU staff and student assistants to test the air for radioactivity. It will be one of about 130 across the nation and the final one installed in Pennsylvania, ensuring that all areas across the state are being tested.

BU volunteers lend hand to local 211 launch

 211 Service Pennsylvania recently introduced its first 211 service. This is a service much like 911 or 411 where a caller can call toll free to find out about social services. For example, someone experiencing domestic violence can dial 211 and find out about temporary shelters in their area, long term programs to help them with their mental and physical needs as well as economic and/or employment needs. The line operates 24 hours per day seven days per week.

Making the 211 service operational was a very large endeavor because it requires contacting all service providers, creating a listing of every program they offer including details such as hours of operation, eligibility requirements, and specific services available and then matching those services to Dewey-decimal style code numbers that allow the computer system to search for specific information accurately.

For Columbia County, the SOLVE Office took the lead in learning the index system and collecting data from agencies via email, open houses, and one-on-one office visits. Jean Downing, director of the SOLVE Office, Heather Feldhaus, assistant dean for the College of Liberal Arts and director of the Center for Community Research and Consulting, and multiple graduate students — Natasha Whipple, Leann Ickes, Drew Shaner and Mary Klebon — and undergraduate students — Samantha Tew and Max Reyes — assisted with the data collection and entry.

West Nile virus still in season

West Nile virus is a mosquito-borne disease that can cause encephalitis, a brain inflammation. Infected mosquitoes pass the virus onto birds, animals and people. West Nile virus cases in Pennsylvania occur primarily in the midsummer or early fall, although mosquito season is usually April to October.

It is not necessary to limit any outdoor activities, unless local officials advise you otherwise. However, you can and should try to reduce your risk of being bitten by mosquitoes. In addition to reducing stagnant water in your yard, make sure all windows and doors have screens, and that all screens are in good repair.

  • If possible, schedule your activities to avoid the times when mosquitoes are most active (around dawn and dusk).
  • Take normal steps to prevent insect bites.
  • Wear shoes, socks, long pants and a long-sleeved shirt when outdoors for long periods of time or when mosquitoes are most active.
  • Consider the use of mosquito repellent, according to directions, when it is necessary to be outdoors. Wash all treated skin and clothing when returning indoors.
  • Place a large fan on your deck to hinder mosquito mobility (mosquitoes are weak fliers).
  • Light decks using General Electric yellow "Bug Lights" (these lights are not mosquito barriers per se, but do not attract mosquitoes as much as other incandescent lights).

Go to the CDC’s website for the latest information on the use of DEET in Insect Repellent Use and Safety.
Remember, electromagnetic and ultrasound devices and Vitamin B are not effective in preventing mosquito bites.

How to help the environment by drinking coffee

BU Dining Services/ARAMARK introduced Eco-Grounds, an environmentally and socially responsible coffee brand in the University’s Roongo’s Café, located in the Warren Student Services Center. The Eco-Grounds program was launched by California based coffee company Java City, and is an extensive line of coffees promoting a myriad of social and environmental issues, including improvement of farmers’ and workers’ standards of living, sustainable agriculture and rainforest preservation.

Roongo’s Café converted all of the locations coffee offerings to Eco-Grounds. Featured flavors include: Utopian Blend, a Fair Trade Certified full flavored brew with hearty spice and smoky aftertaste, Vanilla Bean, also a Fair Trade Certified coffee with exotic vanilla flavor and decaf Café Verde.

“We are pleased to debut Eco-Grounds on Bloomsburg’s Campus and are excited to offer students responsible coffee options that will work for environmental, economic and social betterment,” said Dave Giron, district manager of dining services.

Campus celebrates Husky Pride Day

Husky Pride Day

With the start of a new school year upon us and the fall sports season kicking off this week, we're going all out … all maroon and gold to celebrate the third annual Husky Pride Day. Show us your best school spirit and “Inner Husky” as we kick it up a notch for the fall semester.

Congratulations to the Student Health Center, which was chosen as the winner of the Husky Pride Day contest. Its staff wins lunch at Balzano's courtesy of the University Foundation. Congratulations to the Development Center, which was chosen as runner up. Its staff will receive free tickets to an upcoming Huskies football game courtesy of the Athletics Department. #HuskyPride

Taking whatever life throws at you

Juan Jimenez

Juan Jimenez’s educational journey hasn’t followed the easiest of paths. However, according to those who know him best, this laid back influential Husky wouldn’t want it any other way.

Jimenez, a senior accounting and finance major, is on target to graduate from Bloomsburg University with not just one but two bachelor’s degrees. He will also walk across the graduation stage with a job offer already in hand — a position with the prestigious accounting firm Deloitte Touche, one of the “big four” firms in the world with PricewaterHouseCooper, Ernst & Young, and KPMG. #HuskyUnleashed

U.S. News ranks BU among the best

U.S. News Best Colleges

Bloomsburg University is again listed as one of the best universities in the country, according to U.S. News and World Report’s annual ranking of U.S. colleges and universities. In data released this week, U.S. News lists BU as number 95 of the Best Regional Universities for the northern region, tied with Eastern University and the University of St. Joseph. Bloomsburg is fifth among institutions in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE). Last year, U.S. News rated BU at 104.

Best Regional Universities ranks institutions that offer a full range of undergraduate degrees and some master’s programs but few, if any, doctoral degrees. The 621 universities in the category are ranked against their peer group in one of four geographic regions – north, south, midwest and west.

Cameroon Scholars Lecture Series

Cameroon Scholars Lecture Series

One of the four visiting professors from the University of Buea in Cameroon will be presenting a public lecture at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 24, in Hartline Science Center 108. Samuel Ayonghe, professor environmental geology and associate dean of faculty of science at University of Buea, will present, "Climate Change and Natural Hazards in Africa: The Case of Cameroon."

Environmental science is one of the key aspects of the experiential learning component of BU's winter study abroad program in Cameroon-Ethiopia. Ayonghe's lecture is sponsored by the President's Office, College of Science and Technology and the Global Education Office. #BUSpeakerSeries

Do you want to make a difference on campus?

Peer Assisted Student Success

BU’s Dean of Students Office is searching for mentors. Do you have 24-plus credits? Is your grade point average 2.50 or higher? Then our Peer Assisted Student Success (PASS) mentor program may be a perfect fit.

PASS is looking for students who are interested in making a positive impact here at Bloomsburg University by working with first year students, students in need of positive support, or students that are required to participate as mentees through the Dean of Students Office. If you are interested in being a mentor with the PASS program please contact deanofstudents@bloomu.edu or visit bloomu.edu/dean-students-pass for more information and how to sign up!

Cameroon Scholars Lecture Series

Cameroon Scholars Lecture Series

One of the four visiting professors from the University of Buea in Cameroon will be presenting a public lecture at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 18, in Andruss Library's Schweiker Room. Justine Ayuk, lecturer from the University of Buea's Gender Studies Department, will present "Gender and Development in Cameroon."

Gender Studies is one of the key aspects of the experiential learning component of BU's winter study abroad program in Cameroon-Ethiopia. Ayuk's lecture is sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts. #BUSpeakerSeries

History professor to appear on TLC

TLC

Jeanette Keith, professor of history, will appear on the Tuesday, Sept. 10, episode of TLC’s “Who Do You Think You Are” featuring Emmy-winning actor Jim Parsons of TV’s “The Big Bang Theory.” The documentary-style series pairs celebrities with history experts to discover their ancestral roots. Keith indicated she will appear on the show, which will air at 9 p.m., however she could not reveal more details.

Cameroon Scholars Lecture Series

Cameroon Scholars Lecture Series

Two of the four visiting professors from the University of Buea in Cameroon will be presenting public lectures at 1 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 9, in McCormick Center 2303.

  • Martina Zinkeng, assistant professor of educational psychology, will present “Bilingual Instruction in Cameroon.”
  • Ekoka Molindo, assistant professor of educational leadership and vice dean,” will present “Multicultural Education in Cameroon.

There will be a question and answer session immediately following the lectures. The event is sponsored by the College of Education.

Phi Beta Lambda showcases talent over the summer

Phi Beta Lambda

This summer, Bloomsburg University’s business club, Phi Beta Lambda, sent several students to the National Leadership Conference in Anaheim, California. While there, Nicole Jubin, a Junior accounting major, was elected as Treasurer to the State Chapter. Carol Bachman '13, Business Education, placed third in Future Business Educator at States and seventh at the Nationals. John Katona '13, Accounting, placed second in Accounting for Professionals at States and went on to place seventh at Nationals.

Also, Bloomsburg University’s chapter took two awards at Nationals as well. Phi Beta Lambda took ninth in the “Big Ten” National Chapter Membership Competition and also took an award for being the Second Largest Local Chapter in the Eastern Region of National Phi Beta Lambda. This was the second year for members of our club to receive awards at Nationals and the first year for our Chapter to receive awards. #GetInvolved

Husky Unleashed: Yes, you could move like Usher!

Christina Davis

Continuing to unleash my inner husky I decided to create open hip hop dance classes for students at Bloomsburg University every Friday. After my experience over the years in amazing organizations such as the dance ensemble, vice versa, and the dance minor I am excited to work with more Bloomsburg peers!

I visited Los Angeles over the summer where I took celebrity choreographer classes that have worked with artist such as, Usher, T pain, Black eyed Peas, and Jason Derulo. As well as TV shows Shake it up Chicago, Glee, ABDC etc. inspired by the things I have learned and the feed back choreographers such as Laurie Anne Gibson gave me I would love to pass my knowledge and techniques to others. My dance classes are open to anyone who wants to dance, love to dance, or just want to have a good workout. “I know as college student sometimes you don’t have the time to be dedicated to an organization” so this is open for students to come when ever they want on a Friday.

F.O.C.U.S. returns for first fall semester church visitation

Bethel Deliverance International

Get off to a God start this semester as BU’s Office of Minority Affairs hosts Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, Sept. 8, at 11 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center. Free breakfast at 10:30 a.m. Campus shuttle available for upper campus residents. Come be part of the service. Contact Marcei Woods at (570) 389-4091 for more information.

BU upgrades campus heat and power system

Commonwealth Financing Authority

The Commonwealth Financing Authority has approved a $2 million grant for Bloomsburg University for the purchase and installation of a combined heat and power system. The Authority approved the grant under the Alternative and Clean Energy program, according to state Sen. John R. Gordner (R-27) and Rep. David Millard (R-109). The University will provide the remainder of the funding for the $10 million project.

“The University plans to install a gas boiler system and turbine generator, which will enable it to eliminate all coal fuel use and reduce energy consumption by 2.5%,” said Senator Gordner. The reduction in energy consumption will reduce the University’s reliance on the local electrical substation and will enable the University campus to serve as a shelter for the local community in the event of a regional power outage, such as occurred during the September 2011 flood.

“Bloomsburg University’s existing coal boilers are old and in poor condition, and have been in the process of being phased out over recent years,” said Rep. Millard. Two years ago, the University began utilizing a biomass boiler system to reduce its energy footprint.

The Commonwealth Financing Authority (CFA) was established as an independent agency of the commonwealth to administer Pennsylvania's economic stimulus packages. The CFA holds fiduciary responsibility over the funding of programs and investments in Pennsylvania's economic growth. The Alternative and Clean Energy Program provides financial assistance in the form of grant and loan funds to be used by for the utilization, development and construction of alternative and clean energy projects in the state.

Campus Alert: Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013

Update 5:30 p.m.: Upon further investigation it was determined that the reported assault in the area of Kehr Union did not occur.

In a report today (Sept. 12) to Bloomsburg University Police, a female reported a sexual assault by two unknown males between 2 and 3 a.m. Friday, Sept. 6, in the area of the Kehr Union Patio. Anyone with information is asked to contact BUPD at (570) 389-4168. Always be vigilant of your surroundings and do not walk alone. If you feel threatened or uncomfortable about a situation do not hesitate to notify police. The university recommends students walk in groups and keep a cell phone readily accessible.

Also, consider carrying a whistle. While there are limitations to the effectiveness of a whistle against all threats, it could work well in a difficult situation as students would first blow into the whistle to attract help and then use a cell phone to call for help. For your safety, there are emergency call boxes available throughout campus. If you are in town and need help call 911. This campus alert is issued in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police and Crime Statistics Act of 1990.

A camp where everyone really is one

Camp HERO
Camp HERO More than 125 children who are deaf or hard of hearing recently enjoyed a week of fun and fresh air with several BU students as part of the annual Camp HERO experience at Camp Victory in Millville. The interactive outdoor camp featured many activities, including arts and crafts, line dancing, a zombie chase and music lessons by the Allentown Symphony’s education initiative El Sistema Lehigh Valley.

Each summer, BU students play a major role in Camp HERO’s success and lasting impact. The counselors are mainly students who have a background in working with and teaching children who are deaf or hard of hearing. There are also a number of graduate students in the Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing program who work with the children.

PCN spotlights alum

David Williams David Williams ’81, president and CEO of the Make-A-Wish Foundation and BU’s spring 2012 commencement speaker, is the featured guest on the Sunday, Aug. 19, episode of PCN Profiles. The program will air at 7 p.m. and repeat Monday at 6 a.m. Williams holds a Bachelor of Science in business administration from BU and an MBA from the University of Houston. PCN Profiles features interviews with notable Pennsylvanians. In each episode, profiles sits down with leaders of business, politics, science, sports and the arts to get a candid look at their lives.

Senior earns prestigious PASSHE scholarship

Natalie Wagner Natalie Wagner, an anthropology and mass communications major, was recently among four PASSHE students to earn a William D. Greenlee Scholarship for the upcoming year. The competitive $2,500 scholarship honors the former chair of PASSHE’s Foundation board who had more than 45 years experience in government, public relations and journalism. Greenlee founded Greenlee Associates in 1980, a prominent lobbying and business strategies firm.

McDowell Institute sponsors first event

George Sugai The director of the University of Connecticut’s Center for Behavioral Education and Research will present the first event sponsored by BU’s new McDowell Institute for Teacher Excellence in Positive Behavior Support. George Sugai, also professor of special education and endowed chair of the Neag School of Education at UConn, will speak on “Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support: What is It and Why is It Important?” at 1 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 22, in McCormick Center, room 1303.

Positive Behavior Support is an approach that increases quality of life and decreases problem behavior by teaching new skills and making changes in the classroom environment. The McDowell Institute is designed to equip educators with strategies, practices and experiences to effectively support the academic, social and emotional growth of all students.

Sugai, also co-director of the U.S. Department of Education’s Center of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, has published monographs, college textbooks and more than 100 articles on effective teaching practices, positive behavior support and applied behavior analysis. He previously taught at the University of Oregon and University of Kentucky and earned his master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Washington. The program, an introduction to positive behavior support, is open to the public free of charge. For information or to register, contact Pam Badolato in BU’s College of Education, pbadolat@bloomu.edu.

Students showcase research at regional symposium

Susquehanna Valley Undergraduate Research Symposium A number of Bloomsburg University students displayed research posters at the second annual Susquehanna Valley Undergraduate Research Symposium on Aug. 2 at Geisinger Medical Center’s Henry Hood Center for Health Research. This symposium, sponsored jointly by the Geisinger Center for Health Research, and Bloomsburg and Bucknell universities, provided an opportunity for students to showcase their research activities, learn about other methods and disciplines and gain the experience of presenting at a professional conference.

The 2011 conference showcased the research of students from BU and Bucknell; this year, the conference expanded to include student research interns at Geisinger and an open invitation to students from other regional universities. Conference organizers were Heather Feldhaus, assistant dean of BU’s College of Liberal Arts; Amy Wolaver, Bucknell Institute for Public Policy, and Judith Argon, Geisinger Center for Health Research.

New titles, new duties in student affairs

Two Student Affairs staff members with more than 50 years combined service to Bloomsburg University start 2012-13 with expanded responsibilities reflected in their new titles. Tom Kresch, former director of Residence Life, is now assistant vice president for Student Affairs and Donald W. Young, former director of student standards, is now dean of students. Tom Kresch

Kresch (left), a 1981 BU graduate, is responsible for enhancing the learning environment for campus students. Along with Dione Somerville, vice president for Student Affairs, and Jeff C. Long, assistant vice president, Kresch is part of the senior leadership team that manages the division and develops and implements strategic plans, policies, programs and services. Beginning his 29th year of employment at BU, he is married to Deb Scanlon Kresch ’84, who works in Student Activities. They are the parents of Thomas ’10 and Robert, a junior at BU. Donald Young

Young (right), a Philadelphia native, has worked at BU in various Residence Life and Student Affairs positions for more than 25 years. His office, the Office of the Dean of Students, continues the work of the former Office of Students Standards — administrating BU’s student code of conduct, off-campus housing and commuter student programs — as well as Greek Affairs. The office now has a greater focus on student support, outreach and advocacy. Young earned a bachelor’s degree in education and master’s degree in counseling and higher education from West Chester University.

To correspond with changes in responsibilities, titles have changed for several other staff members. They are: Jennifer Raup, associate dean of students; Anthony Beard, interim assistant dean of students; and Gretchen Osterman, assistant dean of students for Greek Affairs.

Freshmen already doing "Good Work"

Good Work Initiative During orientation, the Class of 2016 freshmen met with faculty, staff, administrator facilitators and OWLs to discuss what it means to do academic Good Work at the collegiate level. Incoming first-year students learned that academic Good Work is work that is excellent (of the highest quality), ethical (socially responsible), and engaged (meaningful and enjoyable). Following the discussions, students offered the following written comments:

    “This discussion session has helped me redefine my motivation for my higher education, specifically my major. I really can make a difference in the real world so long as I have good, solid values, a good work ethic, and a pristine moral code of conduct.”

    “Your decisions impact how you turn out as a person. You need ethics, excellence, and [to be] engaged in college. It was inspirational.”

    “It's important to strive for what's beyond "expected" of you and strive to be exceptional. In order to achieve this you need to be ethical, engaged, and excellent.”

The Good Work model was developed by three prominent psychologists including Howard Gardner, of Harvard, who visited BU last fall, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, of Claremont, and William Damon, of Stanford, who will visit BU on Oct. 16 for a public lecture at 7 p.m. in KUB Ballroom. Contact Jennifer Johnson, Mary Katherine Duncan or Joan Miller for more details on BU’s Good Work Initiative.

Bringing high impact to the new school year

High Impact Practices Institute
A team from BU participated in the High Impact Practices Institute in Portland, Ore., earlier this summer. High Impact Practices include learning communities, freshmen year experiences, service learning, field experiences, and so forth, all of which create a more integrated and engaged learning environment for students. High Impact Practices have the noteworthy ability of improving retention and completion rates among all students.

BU’s team developed and refined an action plan to implement and expand the College of Liberal Arts Freshmen Seminar. The group attended a variety of plenary sessions, engaged in reflective skill-building sessions, and were given time to work as a team collaboratively. (L-R) Tom Kresch, Lisa Stallbaumer, Jonathan Lincoln, Heather Feldhaus, Scott Lowe and Christina Francis.

New faculty sharpen skills for new school year

New Faculty Institute BU's New Faculty Institute, sponsored by the Teaching and Learning Enhancement (TALE) Center, brought 16 new faculty together to discuss and learn about a variety of teaching techniques. Participants attended three-hour seminars for four days in the midst of unpacking and getting their courses ready for the fall semester.

Topics included syllabi design, understanding college students, student motivation, active learning, effective reading, giving quality feedback, diversity, and mid-semester evaluations.

Participants were Soumendra Banerjee, Economics; Charisse Baldoria, Music; Shereen Abdel Kader, Early Childhood and Adolescent Education; Mary Nagy, Communication Studies; Beverly Natividad, Communication Studies; Brooke Lylo, Exceptionality Program; Brent House, English; April Trometter, Math, Computer Sciences, and Statistics; Angelo Costanzo, English; Kelly Tenzek, Communication Studies; Lisa Von Koch, Art and Art History; Jihyun Kim, Communication Studies; Kuo-Hao Lee, Finance; Weijen Hsieh, Math, Computer Sciences, and Statistics; and Dong Zhang, Math, Computer Sciences, and Statistics.

Students showcase research at regional symposium

Susquehanna Valley Undergraduate Research Symposium A number of Bloomsburg University students displayed research posters at the second annual Susquehanna Valley Undergraduate Research Symposium on Aug. 2 at Geisinger Medical Center’s Henry Hood Center for Health Research. This symposium, sponsored jointly by the Geisinger Center for Health Research, and Bloomsburg and Bucknell universities, provided an opportunity for students to showcase their research activities, learn about other methods and disciplines and gain the experience of presenting at a professional conference.

The 2011 conference showcased the research of students from BU and Bucknell; this year, the conference expanded to include student research interns at Geisinger and an open invitation to students from other regional universities. Conference organizers were Heather Feldhaus, assistant dean of BU’s College of Liberal Arts; Amy Wolaver, Bucknell Institute for Public Policy, and Judith Argon, Geisinger Center for Health Research.

Bringing high impact to the new school year

High Impact Practices Institute
A team from BU participated in the High Impact Practices Institute in Portland, Ore., earlier this summer. High Impact Practices include learning communities, freshmen year experiences, service learning, field experiences, and so forth, all of which create a more integrated and engaged learning environment for students. High Impact Practices have the noteworthy ability of improving retention and completion rates among all students.

BU’s team developed and refined an action plan to implement and expand the College of Liberal Arts Freshmen Seminar. The group attended a variety of plenary sessions, engaged in reflective skill-building sessions, and were given time to work as a team collaboratively. (L-R) Tom Kresch, Lisa Stallbaumer, Jonathan Lincoln, Heather Feldhaus, Scott Lowe and Christina Francis.

Meet the new dean of the College of Education

Elizabeth Mauch
Elizabeth Mauch, Ph.D., has accepted the position of dean of the College of Education. She has been serving as interim dean since 2009. Mauch earned her Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics from Moravian College and both her Master’s and Ph.D. from Lehigh University. She began her tenure at Bloomsburg University in 1999 as assistant professor of mathematics. In 2004, Mauch was promoted to associate professor of mathematics and in 2009 became a full professor. You may recall that Dean Mauch played a pivotal role in working with the Advancement Division in securing the funding for the McDowell Institute for Teacher Excellence in Positive Behavior Support.

Interim graduate studies and research dean named

Robert Gates
Robert Gates, Ed.D., will serve as interim associate vice president and dean of Graduate Studies and Research. This vacancy is the result of Larry Fritz , Ph.D., accepting a position as dean of Graduate Studies and Research at the California State University – LA. Gates completed his Bachelor of Science in English at the University of Maine – Farmington. He completed his Master’s in Secondary Education and doctorate in Educational Administration at the University of Louisville. He began his tenure at BU in 1993, in 1997 was promoted to associate professor and in 2001 promoted to full professor. He served as chair of Educational Studies and Secondary Education, the graduate coordinator for the same department and for three years as assistant dean for the (then) College of Professional Studies.

Jones officially named planning and assessment director

Sheila Dove Jones Sheila Dove Jones, Ed.D., has been named director of Planning and Assessment, a position she held as interim director since 2009. Dr. Jones is an alumna, earning both her Bachelor of Science and Master’s in Special Education from Bloomsburg State College. In 1987, she received her doctoral degree from the University of Missouri-Columbia in Special Education Curriculum Development and Educational Administration. Additionally, in 2006, Jones earned a Master of Science in Instructional Technology from BU. She began her career with Bloomsburg University in 1990 and has served primarily in the Department of Exceptionality Programs. Dr. Jones has served in many capacities including director of our TALE Center, Assistant Dean and Director of Field Placement for the (then) College of Professional Studies, Special Education Graduate Advisor and Special Education Program Coordinator.

Learning groups will ensure college credit for prior learning experiences

PASSHE has formed an innovative collaboration with LearningCounts.org and the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL) that will ensure prospective students receive credit for college-level learning they have gained through their work, military or other prior learning experiences. PASSHE universities for years have recognized prior college-level learning as demonstrated through assessments such as the College Board’s College Level Examination Program (CLEP) and Advanced Placement (AP) courses and exams. This new collaboration will broaden the opportunities prospective students have to get their prior learning assessed through a standardized process.

Option enhances web accessibility

Text Only
BU’s website, www.bloomu.edu, now has a text-only option to increase accessibility for those with visual impairments. Clicking “Text Only” in the footer of each page creates a real-time view of the webpage that eliminates graphics and can be read aloud by voice software. The accessibility software, Usablenet Assistive, makes BU’s website compliant with ADA guidelines, said Bill Barnes, manager of technology support services.

Use excess financial aid to buy textbooks!

Textbook Purchasing Program A new process for students to purchase textbooks and other course-related materials at the University Store using excess financial aid is now available. Students are able to seamlessly use their student ID to purchase textbooks and course-related materials, accessing extra financial aid up to $600 to cover the costs. This textbook purchasing program replaces the CGA Emergency Book Loans. No cash back will be given.

Textbook rental program expands — Students will now find nearly half of the required textbooks available for rent under a newly expanded program at the University Store. According to Beth Christian, University Store manager, students will be able to rent 184 of the 400 books faculty have selected for summer classes through a new program with Campus Book Rentals. Under the previous system, just 20 titles would have been available for rent.

To rent a textbook, a student scans the book at a dedicated kiosk in the University Store and pays for the rental with a major credit card. Financial aid cannot be applied to textbook rentals at this time. At the end of the semester, students will return rented books to the University Store. Christian said rentals are available only at the University Store. Students may continue to purchase new and used books online or at the store. Campus Book Rentals, based in Utah, provides textbook rental services to more than 5,000 college bookstores nationwide, including Kutztown, Slippery Rock, IUP and Clarion.

Preschool Mini-Camp for Deaf/Hard of Hearing

Grad students get snapshot of career field

Students in BU’s Education of the Deaf Graduate Teacher Preparation Program continued their summer session work recently with an on-campus Preschool Mini-Camp for Deaf/Hard of Hearing. Graduate students, who enrolled in a Teaching Speech to the Deaf and a Practicum for the Deaf this summer, were paired with a deaf toddler for individualized instruction and therapy in addition full group activities. Photo Gallery of BU's Preschool Mini-Camp for Deaf/Hard of Hearing

Student work featured at regional symposium

Ariana Winder A number of Bloomsburg University students will display research posters at the second annual Susquehanna Valley Undergraduate Research Symposium Thursday, Aug. 2, at Geisinger Medical Center’s Henry Hood Center for Health Research.

This symposium, sponsored jointly by the Geisinger Center for Health Research, and Bloomsburg and Bucknell universities, provides an opportunity for students to showcase their research activities, learn about other methods and disciplines and gain the experience of presenting at a professional conference.

The 2011 conference showcased the research of students from Bloomsburg University and Bucknell; this year, the conference expanded to include student research interns at Geisinger and an open invitation to students from other regional universities. Conference organizers were Heather Feldhaus, assistant dean of BU’s College of Liberal Arts; Amy Wolaver, Bucknell Institute for Public Policy, and Judith Argon, Geisinger Center for Health Research.

Field school students prepare for symposium

Susquehanna Valley Field School Susquehanna Valley Field School students discussed their summer research at a seminar on July 27 in the Student Services Center. Field school students are preparing for the Susquehanna Valley Undergraduate Research Conference on Thursday, Aug. 2 at Geisinger’s Henry Hood Center for Health Research, where they will be joined by field school students from Bucknell University to present their research.

(L-R) Weston Brehm, Kyle Oram and Chris Podeschi (faculty), Shannon Bilder, Brock Minnich, Ryan Funk, Laurel Downs and Keyanna Webb.

Act 101/EOP students celebrate Mandela Day

Mandela Days
Nearly 250 BU students enrolled in the Act 101/EOP Mindsets and Mindfulness Seminar recently observed Mandela Day with community service projects (July 16 to 20) at AGAPE headquarters and the YMCA day camp. Since 2009, approximately 860 students have given about 430 hours of service to the Bloomsburg community in projects coordinated by the SOLVE Office and Sharon Solloway, who teaches Mindsets and Mindfulness.

Mandela Day, in its third year, is an international event designed to inspire individuals to help build a global movement for good. It coincides with the July 18 birthday of Nelson Mandela, former president of South Africa and Nobel peace laureate, who was a political prisoner for 27 years.Photo Gallery: See the connections made!

Camp Aspen youths unearth local history

Camp Aspen
Several local middle school students recently enjoyed their own Indiana Jones’ experience, combining outdoor adventure with archaeology, through the annual Quest Anthropology Camp — BU’s first collaborative summer camp experience. The week-long camp, coordinated by anthropology students, interns and alumni, taught campers how to do archaeological fieldwork, cultural resource management and anthropological analysis through hands-on experience.

In partnership with Quest, the camp also featured several outdoor activities. Among the artifacts found included several lithic cores, arrowheads (lithic biface tools) and many flakes left from someone making stone tools thousands of years ago. Photo: Alex Lindenfeld, 12, and Will Bodenman, 11, hold what is possibly a Baker’s Creek lithic (stone) tool they found.

Kozloff scholar explores Alaskan wilderness

Gessica Barry Gessica Barry, a junior anthropology and Jessica S. and Stephen R. Kozloff Scholarship recipient, spent a month in the remote Alaskan wilderness studying with the Adelphia University archaeology field school. There, she investigated Native Alaskan economic transitions using some of the most advanced technologies currently used in the field.

“Completing this fields school proved I am able to adapt to adverse conditions in the field and will open up doors to work on some of the most remote and fascinating sites in the world.” — Gessica Barry.

Campus donors achieve success in numbers

Blood Drive
Nearly 70 units of blood were collected during BU’s recent campus blood drive, equating to roughly 204 lives saved. In addition, 24 first-time donors were drawn to the July 31 drive. More than 675 units of blood and 2,000 lives have been saved through BU campus blood drives so far this year! #BUServes

New library director has been named

Charlotte Droll
Charlotte Droll has joined the campus community as director of library services. Before coming to BU, she was chair of Colgate University’s reference and instruction department for five years and humanities librarian at Wright State for nine years.

She earned two master’s degrees from the University of Michigan — a master’s in Germanic languages and literatures and a master’s in library and information services — and a bachelor’s degree in German and history from Shippensburg University. Droll replaces David Magolis, who served as interim director of library services for the past three years. Magolis is now assistant professor of mass communications.

Another summer of success for TRiO Upward Bound

Summer Academy
More than 30 high school students from Columbia, Northumberland and Schuylkill counties were recently honored by TRiO Upward Bound at the 2012 Summer Academy Recognition Banquet.

The six-week residential summer academy is designed to simulate a college experience; from developing time management and strengthening academic skills, to living in a residence hall and navigating campus. This summer's educational theme, "World Wise," guided programming activities, academic projects and guest speakers. All of the participating students will be the first in their families to attend college.

Professor gives insight on digital forensics program

John Riley BU’s highly regarded digital forensics program was recently featured by Forensic Focus, an online forum for digital forensics and ediscovery professionals, which profiled John Riley, professor. Riley discussed why he teaches digital forensics, the structure and content of BU’s competitive program and the long-term success it has had on students. Forensic Focus features daily discussions on electronic evidence, data recovery news, course lists, weblogs and related links.

Freshmen begin BU career with food drive

Freshmen Food Drive
BU’s Orientation Workshop Leaders (OWLs) led the incoming freshman Class of 2016 in their first community service experience during the new freshmen orientations. The non-perishable food items collected will be donated to the Bloomsburg Food Cupboard.

Although the new freshmen will be making tremendous contributions to the university community throughout their time on campus, this can drive represents their first contribution to the Town of Bloomsburg community. In total, more than 1,400 items of food were collected over the course of six days.

Law students visit birthplace of Constitution

Law and Legal Environment
Students in Mark Usry’s Law and Legal Environment class, currently studying the U.S. Constitution, recently took a field trip to the Center for the Constitution and Independence Hall in Philadelphia. One of their tour stops included the legislative chamber where the Constitution was signed.

Located on Independence Mall, the National Constitution Center brings the U.S. Constitution to life through multimedia exhibitions, live performances, timely public programs and dynamic educational resources. The center illuminates constitutional ideals and inspires acts of citizenship, so that "We the People" may better secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity.

Future business leaders excel

Phi Beta Lambda
Three members of BU’s chapter of Phi Beta Lambda (Future Business Leaders of America) were recently honored at the National Leadership Conference in San Antonio, Texas, which featured more than 1,800 participants from institutions all across the country. They were accompanied by Ed Pitingolo, advisor and associate professor of accounting.

  • Jeremy Rhen finished fifth nationally in the Business Law competition.
  • Bryce Liggins finished seventh in the Marketing Concepts competition.
  • Carol Bachman finished seventh in the Future Business Teacher event.

In addition, Pitingolo was recognized regionally and nationally for his service to BU’s chapter and state chapter. (L-R) Jeremy Rhen, Carol Bachman, Bryce Liggins and Pitingolo.

Business Education showcased in national publication

BU’s business education program was recently recognized as a model program in Trends and Issues in Business Education, the 2012 National Business Education Yearbook, a refereed publication. John Olivo, chair of the business education and ITM department, and Dennis Gehris, associate dean of the College of Business, are quoted in the chapter, “Model Business Education Programs.”

Academic and Cultural Immersion

Cameroon-Ethiopia Study Abroad During the 2012 Cameroon-Ethiopia Summer Study Abroad program, a group of BU students participated in a wide variety of academic and cultural enrichment activities, including visits to the African Union Headquarters in Addis Ababa and the Ethiopian National Museum — where a replica of Lucy is housed. The students also:

  • took cooking lessons
  • performed African dances and choral music to an audience of more than 300 Cameroonian students and faculty
  • played and read with Cameroon children
  • presented gifts to an orphanage
  • took a canoe ride up the river Lobe to visit a camp of Pygmies and the Baka people
  • hiked into the Korup Rain Forest and up Mount Cameroon

PASSHE sets 2012-13 tuition rates

The Board of Governors of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education approved a 3 percent tuition increase Monday, July 9, for the 2012-13 academic year, honoring its commitment to the Legislature and the governor, and marking the fifth time in eight years the increase has been either at or below the rate of inflation. The $188 increase — $94 per semester — ensures PASSHE will remain the lowest-cost option among all four-year colleges and universities in the Commonwealth. The total cost of attendance — including tuition, fees, room and board — also likely will remain below the national average, and significantly below the average in the Middle States region, which comprises Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania.

Governor signs Higher Education Modernization Act

A series of bills known collectively as the Higher Education Modernization Act will provide Bloomsburg University and her sister PASSHE institutions with new competitive and cost-savings opportunities. Under the act, signed into law by Gov. Tom Corbett, the universities also will be able to offer advanced degree programs to meet the needs of employers in the region and commonwealth. The signing comes as the final step in an 18-month process, and the measures will take effect in about two months.

Pichini re-elected chair of PASSHE Board of Governors

Guido M. Pichini has been re-elected to a second term as chairman of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education’s Board of Governors. Pichini last year became the first PASSHE university alumus to chair the Board that oversees the State System. The Board also elected as its vice chairs, Marie Conley, a BU alumna who serves as executive director of the recently formed Paterno Foundation, and Aaron A. Walton of Allison Park, a retired senior vice president for Highmark Inc. Both also are PASSHE university graduates.

As director of the Paterno Foundation, Conley oversees the organization that was established by the family of former Pennsylvania State University football Coach Joe Paterno to fund a variety of initiatives whose purpose is to “improve lives though education.” Conley also has been a fundraising and political consultant, having served on numerous statewide campaigns. She also served as the director for the Pennsylvania delegation to the 2000, 2004 and 2008 Republican National Conventions.

Scam targeting students

Bloomsburg University Police are investigating a scam targeting Bloomsburg University students. Students have received checks from someone who claims to be coming here from another country to attend classes or teach and needs a “personal assistant.” When students deposit the checks into their accounts, the scammers get banking information and remove money from the account.

The checks are then returned from closed accounts and students are liable for the funds. Bloomsburg University’s email is not being used. If you receive this message, do not share personal information or deposit the check. Incidents should be reported to Bloomsburg University Police at (570) 389-4168.

Campus Alert: Wednesday, Aug. 1

At approximately 9:40 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 1, Bloomsburg University Police responded to an alert of a bulletin board on fire in Columbia Hall. Police were alerted by the fire alarm system in the residence hall. The fire was immediately put out.

Bloomsburg University Police is investigating the incident. An officer is onsite in the residence hall for the evening. Any information regarding the fire should be provided to Bloomsburg University Police at (570) 389-4168. Always be vigilant of your surroundings. If you see anything suspicious do not hesitate to notify police. This campus alert is issued in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police and Crime Statistics Act of 1990.

Greek Life

Defining the life behind Greek Life

Connecting with and giving back to the community is an integral part of Greek Life and the foundation of BU’s 29 Greek organizations, each of which provide unique opportunities for students to serve the community.

Greek Life From volunteering with neighborhood clean ups like The Big Event and children events like Kids’ Fun Day to giving blood and raising money for charities, such as the Ronald McDonald House and American Cancer Society, Greek Life provides a much needed hand to those in need and support for other groups throughout the year.

Spearheaded by the overwhelming effort to aid Bloomsburg’s Flood Relief this past fall, Greek Life tallied nearly 12,000 hours of community service. Among the past semester’s activities included assisting BU’s inaugural Women’s Day of Dialogue, SOLVE's Empty Bowls Banquet, Bowl for Kids’ Sake, Kids’ Fun Day, and of course, CGA's The Big Event – which in itself drew more than 750 student volunteers despite chilly temperatures and drizzling rain.

So it begins: A journey through Lebanon

Robby Nixon Robby Nixon, a history major, is finishing an intense 10-day Lebanon Summer Fellowship, where he has immersed himself in the culture through an itinerary packed with trips to cedar forests and ancient cities, to museums and meetings with important figures. Nixon, the head delegate for BU's Model Arab League, takes us along his journey into the heart of Lebanon that included an insightful meeting with three Lebanese journalists.

"Overall, the visit so far has been an intense and in-depth look at Lebanon as a whole. Our days are marked by a rigid schedule that, sometimes unfortunately, must be kept closely if everything is to get done in time. But the experience is incredible, and we have enjoyed nothing but the best hospitality." — Robby Nixon #BUAbroad

Biology grad places in national competition

Meghan Duell Meghan Duell, a recent biology graduate, won third prize in the oral presentation category at the national convention of Beta Beta Beta, the biology honor society, in Puerto Rico. She qualified to present her work at the national convention by winning the outstanding presentation award in March at the 2012 Northeast District 2 Regional Convention, hosted by Bloomsburg University, for her research on “Honeybee Stress: Behavioral and Physiological Implications of Flumethrin Treatment.” Duell was mentored by John Hranitz, Ph.D., professor of biological and allied health sciences.

Math and Science Summer Experience

Math and Science Summer Experience
Roughly 50 area middle and high school students were immersed in numbers, computer animation, astronomy, chemistry and physics from June 25 to June 29 during the College of Science and Technology’s Math and Science Summer Experience. Among the week-long activities include learning mathematical diversions, the night sky, kitchen chemistry and the physics of sound.

A Husky in Beirut: The Living City

Robby Nixon Robby Nixon, a junior history major, is on an intense 10-day Lebanon Summer Fellowship in Beirut, where he is immersing himself in the culture through an itinerary packed with trips to cedar forests and ancient cities, to museums and meetings with important figures to discuss everything from politics to business to the press. Nixon, who is the Head Delegate for the BU Model Arab League, takes us along his first journey into Beirut where he leaves with an unexpected perspective, describing it as very much alive, ancient and yet growing. He says Beirut is a city full of complimentary contrasts. #BUAbroad

A “koofi” look at the Arabic language

Michael Curry
Mike Curry, a digital forensics major, is halfway through his intensive Arabic program in Meknes, Morocco, where he is spending four hours a day studying classical Arabic and three hours a week studying the Moroccan dialect. Curry updates us on his experience of following the footsteps of the Romans and trying his hand at Arabic calligraphy.
"I’m proud to say I’ve made the greatest memories of my life so far with my new friends. There has been so much laughter amongst us, and I have a myriad of pictures I have been taking to look back on and relive these six weeks all over again." #BUAbroad

Design and delivery of study abroad while studying abroad

Ryan Geiger Ryan Geiger, a graduate student in BU’s Guidance Counseling and Student Affairs program, recently completed his European study abroad journey that included Switzerland, Ireland and Spain. Geiger, BU's first counseling student to pursue study abroad, gets us caught up with a visit to the birthplace of the Renaissance and then with a day trip to Siena.
"Everything is fresh and delicious! Food is a real art in Italy and the shopkeepers take their craft seriously. It doesn’t matter if you’re at an elegant restaurant that serves a seven-course meal or a bar to get a quick sandwich. A testament to how good the food is — it’s a challenge to get me to eat a tomato in the states, in Italy, not only have I been eating them, but they are really good; especially paired with mozzarella." #BUAbroad

A life-changing classroom experience

Urban Practicum 2012 Sixty-three BU students recently completed what many of them considered to be a life-changing experience while also having the opportunity to teach and observe in real classrooms. From May 14 to 24, these graduate and undergraduate students from the College of Education took part in the 2012 Urban Practicum in Bethlehem. For two weeks, they were in kindergarten through eighth grade classrooms across the Bethlehem and Easton Area school districts in one of five different area schools including Marvine Elementary School, Paxinosa Elementary School, Fountain Hill Elementary School, Lincoln Elementary School and Broughal Middle School.

Audiology program helps Special Olympics

Special Olympics
A group of graduate students and faculty representing BU’s audiology program were among those recently lending a hand to the 43rd Special Olympics Pennsylvania’s Annual Summer Games at Penn State University, which featured more than 2,000 athletes, 750 coaches and 2,500 volunteers from the community, organizations and corporations around the state. The Summer Games featured three days of intense competition in aquatics, athletics, basketball, bowling, equestrian, golf, gymnastics, softball and tennis.
Launched in 1997, Special Olympics Healthy Athletes program offers free health services and information to athletes. This initiative works to:

  • improve access and health care for Special Olympics athletes
  • make referrals to local health practitioners when appropriate
  • train health care professionals and students about the needs and care of people with intellectual disabilities
  • collect, analyze and disseminate data on the health status and needs of people with intellectual disabilities
  • and advocate for improved health policies and programs for people with intellectual disabilities

The Special Olympics Healthy Hearing program in Pennsylvania includes audiologists and graduate students from around the state. Those from BU helping the hearing program were (L-R) Thomas Zalewski, Ph.D., Ashlee Gentile, Sasha Prendergast, Anna Pham, Kristen Horan, Erin Lolley and Joe Motzko.

Secretarial Roundtable provides gift to AGAPE

Secretarial Roundtable
Members of the BU Secretarial Roundtable recently gave a donation of more than $400 to Eileen Chapman, of AGAPE, from the proceeds made from the Chinese Auction at the annual Administrative Professional Symposium held on April 25 at Ponduce Farms.

(L-R) Eileen Chapman, executive director of AGAPE, Vickey Rainis, Donna Gillaspy, Pam Badolato and Beth Brennan, chairperson of the Roundtable. Members not shown are Pat Stockalis, Becky Musselman, Carla Rodenhaver, Michele Slusser, Jamie Cotner, Amy Long and Linda Lapp.

COB interim dean finalists named

Sutliff Hall Two finalists for the position of Interim Dean of the College of Business are scheduled to meet with members of the campus community on Thursday, June 20.

  • George Ebbs, Jr. is a retired president of Embry-Riddle University. During his 12-year-tenure at Embry-Riddle, Ebbs also served as professor of Aviation and Aerospace Leadership. His experience includes teaching business courses at Columbia University Graduate School of Business and Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn MBA. Dr. Ebbs earned his bachelor’s degree in metallurgical engineering from Purdue University, master’s degree in policy and production from University of Washington, and a doctoral degree in business policy and organization management from Columbia University Graduate School of Business.
  • Carol Matteson is President Emerita of Mount Ida College in Newton, MA. Matteson was president and professor of management at Mount Ida College for 10 years. She also served as executive vice president/provost and professor of management at Rowan University in Glassboro, New Jersey. Prior to this, Dr. Matteson served as provost and vice president for academic affairs at Bloomsburg University from 1992-95 and dean of the college of business for three years (1989 -92). Dr. Matteson earned her bachelor’s degree in health education from Slippery Rock University, a master’s degree in psychomotor learning from the University of Oregon, and a doctoral degree in organization studies from the University of Pittsburgh, Katz Graduate School of Business.

The finalists are members of The Registry for College and University Presidents, a nonprofit organization which engages former university and senior administrators interested in service in interim leadership roles. The interim dean will provide academic leadership and coordination for the College of Business during this time of transition. The selected individual will serve as Interim Dean for one-year as the University searches for a permanent leader.

Candidates' campus itineraries!

Meet the new dean of the College of Education

Elizabeth Mauch Elizabeth Mauch, Ph.D., has accepted the position of dean of the College of Education. She has been serving as interim dean since 2009. Mauch earned her Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics from Moravian College and both her Master’s and Ph.D. from Lehigh University. She began her tenure at Bloomsburg University in 1999 as assistant professor of mathematics. In 2004, Mauch was promoted to associate professor of mathematics and in 2009 became a full professor. You may recall that Dean Mauch played a pivotal role in working with the Advancement Division in securing the funding for the McDowell Institute for Teacher Excellence in Positive Behavior Support.

Interim graduate studies and research dean named

Robert GatesRobert Gates, Ed.D., will serve as interim associate vice president and dean of Graduate Studies and Research. This vacancy is the result of Larry Fritz , Ph.D., accepting a position as dean of Graduate Studies and Research at the California State University – LA. Gates completed his Bachelor of Science in English at the University of Maine – Farmington. He completed his Master’s in Secondary Education and doctorate in Educational Administration at the University of Louisville. He began his tenure at BU in 1993, in 1997 was promoted to associate professor and in 2001 promoted to full professor. He served as chair of Educational Studies and Secondary Education, the graduate coordinator for the same department and for three years as assistant dean for the (then) College of Professional Studies.

Jones officially named planning and assessment director

Sheila Dove Jones Sheila Dove Jones, Ed.D., has been named director of Planning and Assessment, a position she held as interim director since 2009. Dr. Jones is an alumna, earning both her Bachelor of Science and Master’s in Special Education from Bloomsburg State College. In 1987, she received her doctoral degree from the University of Missouri-Columbia in Special Education Curriculum Development and Educational Administration. Additionally, in 2006, Jones earned a Master of Science in Instructional Technology from BU. She began her career with Bloomsburg University in 1990 and has served primarily in the Department of Exceptionality Programs. Dr. Jones has served in many capacities including director of our TALE Center, Assistant Dean and Director of Field Placement for the (then) College of Professional Studies, Special Education Graduate Advisor and Special Education Program Coordinator.

A pioneering look at study abroad

Ryan Geiger Ryan Geiger, a graduate student in BU’s Guidance Counseling and Student Affairs program, is making his way through Europe on a study abroad journey that includes Switzerland, Ireland and Spain. Geiger, BU's first counseling student to pursue study abroad, has already encountered several exciting adventures! His latest stop in Italy, he came across the Pope in a surprising way while visiting the Vatican.
"The second day started off rather leisurely with breakfast in the hotel of a croissant with Nutella and coffee. We assembled our group and walked to another country, Vatican City. The Vatican is its own sovereign nation within Italy. This is a relatively short walk through central Rome across the Tiber River." #BUAbroad

Field school shifts into higher gear

Anthropology Field School
BU’s anthropology field school with SUNY-Geneseo is in its fourth and final week in Chillicothe, Ohio. In just three weeks, the group has discovered more than 200 Hopewell Culture artifacts, been featured in the local newspaper, learned new field research techniques and formed lasting friendships — a range of adventures students say can only be found through Life in the Dig.

Becoming completely immersed in Arabic

Michael Curry Mike Curry, a digital forensics major, is taking an intensive Arabic program in Meknes, Morocco, where he is spending four hours a day studying classical Arabic and three hours a week studying the Moroccan dialect. Outside the classroom, Curry — who plans to use this study abroad experience as a gateway to the FBI — wants to immerse himself in the culture, including finding an opportunity to ride a camel. #BUAbroad

Jones Center hosts Temple Grandin’s mother

Eustacia Cutler Eustacia Cutler, a Harvard graduate and noted autism researcher, will be the keynote speaker for the upcoming Jones Center Summer Institute on “Autism: Attitudes and Acceptance Celebrating 5 Year of Building Relationships.” In her book, “A Thorn in My Pocket,” Cutler describes raising Temple Grandin in the “Leave it to Beaver” world of the 1950s when children with autism were routinely diagnosed as infant schizophrenics and banished to institutions.

Grandin grew to become doctor of animal science and professor at Colorado State University, bestselling author, and consultant to the livestock industry on animal behavior. Cutler lectures nationally and internationally on autism and its relation to the rapidly emerging bio-neurological study of brain plasticity.

The conference which will be held Friday, July 13, from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Bloomsburg Area High School, also features several other speakers on autism, including Mary Katherine Duncan, Ph.D., professor of psychology, and James Krause, assistant dean of the College of Education. Act 48 Credits and Paraeducators Training Hours also available. Deadline for registration is Saturday, June 30.

Arts Showcase brings together area creativity

ICS Showcase BU’s Institute for Culture and Society (College of Liberal Arts) inaugurated its first Area Arts Showcase on May 8 at the Moose Exchange in Bloomsburg with guest speaker Cassandra Pisieczko, a Bloomsburg Theatre Ensemble member and director of BTE’s recent play, “When Hysteria meets the Hysterical: Staging Sarah Ruhl’s In the Next Room, or the Vibrator Play,” which is an in-depth look at directing the most currently produced stage play in the country. Pisieczko discussed the historical research she did to direct the production, and to help develop the musical and set design aspects of the production.

Music program students Matt Leece (guitar) and Charlie Bryant (saxophone) also performed for the evening event. The new Area Arts Showcase initiative is designed to connect local creative and performing arts activities in the Susquehanna Valley with the Institute and the BU community. In the fall, the Institute also plans to invite back the Early Music Ensemble, whose performance was postponed.

Students present research at global conference

GASI Conference Five BU students recently attended the Global Awareness Society International Annual Conference in New York City and presented their scholarly papers in front of an academic audience and received feedback to improve their work for the future. Four of the students were fully supported by the Office of Global Education.

Student Researchers

  • William Lovell, “Integrating Cultural Synergy and Leadership Development through Globalized Initiatives”
  • Spencer McHugh, “Innovation and Globalization: Investing for the Future”
  • Chris Rumbough, “Recommendation for a US Policy on Poverty
  • Joshua Stout, “Cultural Integration for Expatriates on a Superior Level through a Direct Focus Institution”
  • ASM Tuhin, “A Sustainable Workforce for A Growing Industry: What Path Will Bangladesh Follow to Save the Garments Industry”

Students join in Cameroon celebration

Summer Study Abroad
A group of BU students led by English faculty S. Ekema Agbaw and Stephanie Schlitz, along with David Walker, assistant professor of early childhood and adolescent education, on a five-week summer study broad program in Cameroon and Ethiopia joined Cameroonians in Buea, capital of the South-West region to celebrate their national day. After watching the national day parade with Cameroonian dignitaries from the grandstand, the student and faculty were invited to the governor’s annual gala.

During their time abroad, the students studied at the University of Buea, Cameroon and visited historic and cultural sites in Ethiopia. Buea is located at the foot of Cameroon Mountain, the highest peak in West Africa, and is the only English-speaking university in this bilingual country.

Student research showcased at PASSHE conference

PASSHE Undergraduate Anthropology Research Conference
Sixteen BU students were among the collection of student anthropologists from across the state presenting research at the 26th Annual PASSHE Undergraduate Anthropology Research Conference at West Chester University late in the spring semester. Twelve different presentations were made. Travel and research for the conference was supported by the College of Liberal Arts, the Community Government Association, Department of Anthropology and Anthropology Club.

Student Presenters

PASSHE Undergraduate Anthropology Research Conference

  • Jimmy Muwombi, “Disaster Anthropology, Assessment, and Support in Bloomsburg , Pennsylvania: The Tropical Storm Lee Flood of 2011”
  • Gabrielle Vielhauer, “How Public Is Public Anthropology? An Ethnographic Assessment of Public Interest in and Support of Cultural Enrichment Services, such as the National Park Service”
  • Beverly Hendricks, “Diverse Religions: Christian Perceptions”
  • Elizabeth Kinger, “Views on Divorce and Marriage in a College Student Population”
  • Jennifer D’Amico, “An Uneven Starting Point: College Students’ Experiences of Social Class”
  • Alexa Rose and Melanie Yoduck, “Anthropologists and Assessments in Academia: An Application of Library Ethnography”
  • Gessica Barry, “A Tale of Three Houses: A Comparison of three Hopewell Domestic Structures”
  • Leona Roselli, Alexa Rose and Amanda Adler, “And when is there time to remember, to sift, to weigh, to estimate, to total?: Microcontextual Analysis of Disposal Practices at the Lady’s Run Site, Chillicothe, Ohio”
  • Emily Burnett, “Blowing the Whistle: Spectator Harassment at Sporting Events”
  • Katelyn McMichael and Michael Grevera, “The Effect of Age on Gender Differences in Adults who Experience Childhood Trauma Associated with 9/11 Violence”
  • Kristen Kelly, “Anthropology of Law and Violence on the West Bank and Gaza Strip: Bloomsburg University Students’ Knowledge and Opinion on the Conflict”
  • Brittany Vaszlavik, “Social Support and the College First Year Experience”

Biology research presented to international audience

Biology Research
Keith Kinek, a senior biology major, and Ryan Dorkokosk, a biology graduate student, recently presented their research at the Society for Freshwater Science annual meeting in Louisville, Ky., where approximately 1,000 international aquatic scientists were in attendance.

Kinek presented, “Storm runoff and polyphosphate storage in periphyton communities inhabiting autotrophic and heterotrophic streams,” while Dorkokosk presented, “Using extracellular enzymes to monitor water quality in streams.” Both are students of Steven Rier, Ph.D., associate professor of biological and allied health sciences, who himself presented a talk, “Quantifying the role of polyphosphate storage in stream periphyton across environmental gradients,” at the annual meeting.

Spring Commencement

Congratulations Class of 2012!

Storify Nearly 1,300 undergraduate students and 238 graduate students received degrees during BU’s spring commencement ceremonies May 11 in Mitrani Hall and May 12 on the Academic Quad.

David Williams, president and CEO of the Make-A-Wish Foundation of America, highlighted the undergraduate ceremonies with a memorable commencement speech about facing fear and failure to achieve success.Graduation Gallery

Alumnus returns as commencement speaker

David Williams
Alumnus David Williams, president and chief executive officer of the Make-A-Wish Foundation of America, will speak at BU’s undergraduate commencement ceremonies Saturday, May 12, at 10 a.m. for the College of Liberal Arts and the College of Education and 3 p.m. for the College of Business and the College of Science and Technology. Both will be held outdoors on the campus’ Academic Quadrangle.

Faculty collaborate to enhance teaching

TALE Academy
Eight faculty members spent this past week enhancing their teaching approaches through TALE’s Teaching Excellence Academy, which offers intensive exploration on the theory and practice of university teaching. Fellows are expected not only to apply what they learn to their own teaching but also provide leadership and expertise to their colleagues. TALE Academy

Fellows explored course design principles by discussing and applying what they learned about the topic from studying L. Dee Fink’s “Creating Significant Learning Experiences.”

They applied the discussion ideas and book to their course design projects. In addition, the academy had guests present on Motivating the Unmotivated; Active Learning, Fact and Implementation Strategies; Teaching Writing in the Disciplines and What does diversity have to do with course design? Academy Fellows were Barbara Wilson (Exceptionality Programs), Dave Magolis (Mass Communications), Ted Roggenbuck (Writing Center Director and English), Kali Fedor (Early Childhood and Adolescent Education), Jennifer Oast (History), Kathleen Foreman (Development Instruction), Jeff Brunskill (Envionmental, Geographical and Geological Sciences) and Christina Francis (English).

A trowel in hand, campfire conversations

Anthropology Field School
DeeAnne Wymer, professor of anthropology, and a group of BU students hit the road each spring in mid-May to spend four weeks in southern Ohio digging at a Hopewell habitation site. The archeological field school experience enables student teams to rely on new imaging technologies to uncover another living site of the Mound Builders from 2,000 years ago. The students have checked in again, describing their second week in the field as not only a valuable archaeological training and long-lasting college experience.

Discovering fun through ... dirt?

Anthropology Field School DeeAnne Wymer, professor of anthropology, and a group of BU students hit the road each spring in mid-May to spend four weeks in southern Ohio digging at a Hopewell habitation site. The archeological field school experience enables student teams to rely on new imaging technologies to uncover another living site of the Mound Builders from 2,000 years ago. The students, some who are camping overnight for the first time, have checked in to say the first week in the field has already opened their eyes to new things, even finding fun through exhaustion.

Students continue Spanish studies abroad

Summer Study Abroad
A group of nine BU students, a collection of Spanish majors and minors, are spending a part of this summer studying at Universitas Castellae Valladolid, Spain. The students are also getting a first-hand taste of the culture and vast its vast history. They recently took a train to Lisbon, Portugal, where they toured the Castle of São Jorge, Jeronimos Monastery and Padrão dos Descobrimentos.

Studying abroad are Mat Sullivan, Maggie Canavan, Meghan Ruland, Cailee Carmella, Ellen Pronio, Leonilde Clemente, Louisa Andrew, Christa Irzinski and Ian Shields. Amarilis Hidalgo de Jesus, Ph.D., professor of languages and cultures, organized their abroad experience.

Students broaden their experience

Harrisburg Practicum Students of Todd Hoover, Ed.D., assistant professor of early childhood and adolescent education, and Michael Patte, Ph.D., associate professor of education studies and secondary education, attained valuable in-the-field experience of inner city classrooms through the Harrisburg Urban Practicum from May 13 to 25. In addition to working in Harrisburg Area School District classrooms, the education majors:

  • participated in community activity projects while interacting with students, parents and community leaders
  • attended professional development seminars
  • interact in learning forums that focus on urban education
  • and visit local historical and cultural areas and museums

Contact Todd Hoover at (570) 389-5376 for details, including how to get involved in next year's practicum.

Graduate students present at state education conference

Curriculum and Instruction Melissa Mabus, Lloyd Ebersole, and Susan Field (L-R), graduate students in the master’s program in curriculum and instruction, recently presented at the Pennsylvania Association for Curriculum and Supervision Development (PASCD) Conference in Hershey. The title of their session was “10 Technologies Every Teacher Needs to Know.”

They were assisted by Raymond Pastore, Ph.D., professor of educational studies and secondary education. The PASCD Conference is a statewide conference attended by teachers, professors, administrators, and school board members. Mabus, Ebersole, and Field are members of the BU student chapter of ASCD. Twenty BU students from the chapter attended the conference and represented the largest turnout of students from any university.

BU announces dean departure, appointments

Michael Tidwell Michael Tidwell, Ph.D., will leave Bloomsburg University in mid-July to become dean of the College of Business at Eastern Michigan University. Our students will long benefit from Tidwell’s vision, leadership and commitment to providing outstanding learning opportunities, including the Zeigler Institute for Professional Development. We wish him well.

BU is also happy to announce three appointments:

  • Elizabeth Mauch, Ph.D., has accepted the position of dean of the College of Education. Mauch came to BU in 1999 as assistant professor of mathematics and has served as interim dean of the COE since 2009.
  • Robert Gates, Ed.D., will serve as interim associate vice president and dean of graduate studies and research. Gates, who joined BU as an assistant professor in 1993, has chaired educational studies and secondary education since 2001. He replaces Larry Fritz, who will become dean of graduate studies and research at California State University, Los Angeles, effective June 1.
  • Sheila Dove Jones, Ed.D., has been named director of planning and assessment. Jones, a professor of exceptionality programs at Bloomsburg since 1990, has served as interim director of the planning and assessment office since 2009.

New textbook purchasing program on its way

Textbooks A new process for students to purchase textbooks and other course-related materials at the University Store using excess financial aid will soon be available. Students will be able to seamlessly use their student ID to purchase textbooks and course-related materials, accessing extra financial aid up to $600 to cover the costs. This textbook purchasing program will replace the CGA Emergency Book Loans. No cash back will be given.

Textbook rental program expands

Students enrolled in summer classes at BU will find nearly half of the required textbooks available for rent under a newly expanded program at the University Store. According to Beth Christian, University Store manager, students will be able to rent 184 of the 400 books faculty have selected for summer classes through a new program with Campus Book Rentals. Under the previous system, just 20 titles would have been available for rent, she said.

To rent a textbook, a student scans the book at a dedicated kiosk in the University Store and pays for the rental with a major credit card. Financial aid cannot be applied to textbook rentals at this time. At the end of the semester, students will return rented books to the University Store. Christian said rentals are available only at the University Store. Students may continue to purchase new and used books online or at the store. Campus Book Rentals, based in Utah, provides textbook rental services to more than 5,000 college bookstores nationwide, including Kutztown, Slippery Rock, IUP and Clarion.

Anthropology majors land big awards

Gessica Barry Gessica Barry, a junior anthropology major, is one of two 2012 Jessica S. and Stephen R. Kozloff Undergraduate Research Scholarship recipients, while Gabby Vielhauer, a junior anthropology major, was awarded a THIS Scholarship Semester internship with the Historical and Museum Commission in Harrisburg. Barry, of Danville, will be working in a technology-intensive field school in Alaska at a 10,000-year-old site. Vielhauer, of Pottstown, will begin her internship this fall after finishing her summer field school experience in Ohio. Gabby Vielhauer

Former BU President Jessica S. Kozloff and her husband Stephen R. Kozloff established the endowed scholarship to recognize the strong faculty-student relationship that exists at BU and to inspire continued collaboration. The scholarship is awarded directly to BU students involved in scholarly or creative work.

Since 1989, PASSHE has sponsored a semester-long internship program for outstanding students, in all academic majors, from its 14 universities. The Harrisburg Internship Semester (THIS) places these selected students in working relationships with policymakers in the executive and legislative branches of Pennsylvania government, as well as with independent boards, agencies, and commissions. THIS provides an important and enriching academic experience where students learn the dynamics of state government in new and powerful ways through direct involvement in report and speech writing, research, and program design and evaluation.

Springfest 2012 draws record crowd

Springfest BU’s Springfest 2012 saw more than 600 students participate this year, celebrating the end of the spring semester with games, outdoor activities, team challenges and numerous contests. Among the activities included flip-flop decorating, Zumba, inflatable obstacle courses, Double Dutch contest, and Quest’s climbing wall and high adventure challenges.

Residence Hall Banner Contest: 1st place – Lycoming Hall; 2nd place – Schuylkill Hall; 3rd place – Montour Hall.

Student Group Banner Contest: 1st place – DASL Campus Leadership; 2nd place – Quest; 3rd place – Alpha Sigma Tau.

Prince and Princess Contest: Ryan Austin and Adam Bertino.

Lambda Alpha inductees honored

Lambda Alpha
BU’s Department of Anthropology recently honored its 26 inductees into the Lambda Alpha National Collegiate Honors Society in Anthropology. Those honored were Monique Harmon, Rose Rosental, Jessica Soroka, Samantha Nowka, Kristin Stauffer, Aaron Gray, Elizabeth Kinder, Frank Hickman, Amy Mowrey, Brooke Matza, Nikotah Kistner, Rebecca Kestel, Leona Roselli, Amanda Adler, Teri Upright, Katelyn McMichael, Shaina Davis, Jimmy Muwombi, John Barnett, Mike Grevera, Lydia Delgado, Tristan Adrian, Beverly Hendricks, Kevin Ward, Natalie Wagner and Kayla Maciorkoski.

Chemistry research showcased on national stage

American Chemical Society National Spring Meeting
Seven students and two faculty represented BU’s chemistry program this spring at the 2012 American Chemical Society National Spring Meeting in San Diego. Students presented their collaborative research through poster presentations, while the faculty showcased their work through platform presentations.

Mark Tapsak, Ph.D., associate professor of chemistry, presented “Detailed thermal characterization of decanylene containing polysilalkylenesiloxanes,” while Philip Osburn, Ph.D., assistant professor of chemistry presented “Polyisobutylene-supported bidentate triazole-NHC-palladium complex as a recyclable catalyst for the Heck reaction.” Student presentations included:

Student Poster Presentations

  • Alan J. Shaffer, “Synthesis of Novel N,N'-(2-alkyl)aryl-imidazol-2-inium halide salts, Precursors of N-Heterocyclic Carbenes”. Mentor: John Morgan (Bloomsburg University)
  • Adam D. Miller, “Exploration of Heterobimetallic Complexes of Chromium and Cobalt”. REU at University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. Mentor: Connie C. Lu.
  • Jerome D. Roscioli, “Predicting Transport Properties at High Temperature and Pressure”. Mentor: Gregory Zimmerman (Bloomsburg University).
  • Jerome D. Roscioli, “Imaging Babesia bovis Infected Erythrocytes And Free Parasites Using Atomic Force Microscopy”. REU at Washington State University. Mentors: Louis Scudiero and Carlos Suarez.
  • Jarid M. Metz, “Synthesis and Reactivity Studies on the Polynuclear Metal Cluster Os3(CO)10[1,2-p-tolylS(C6H4)PPh2]”. REU at University of North Texas. Mentor: Michael G. Richmond.
  • Jordan N. Metz, ”Novel Solid Nano-Particles for Low Temperature Selective Synthesis of Methyl Levulinate from Carbohydrates and Biomass Resources”. REU at University of Connecticut. Mentor: Dr. Steven Suib.
  • Chris L. Houser, “Surface Deacetylation of Chitin Nanocrystals”. REU at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Mentor: Maren Roman.

Remember ‘Then and Now’ this weekend

Nellie Swarts Four alumni will be honored when Bloomsburg University graduates return to campus to celebrate “Bloomsburg: Then and Now,” Alumni Weekend 2012, from Friday to Sunday, May 18 to 20. Kathleen Shanoski Mulligan ’67 and Bette Anderson Grey ’81 will receive Distinguished Service awards. The Maroon and Gold Excellence Award, which honors a graduate of the last 15 years, will be given to Lynette Luckers ’01.

Nelson Swarts ’63, a graduate of the College of Business and retired IBM executive, will be the first recipient of the William Derricott ’66 Volunteer of the Year Award. Also, Irvin Wright, assistant to the provost for diversity initiatives and director of the ACT 101/EOP, will be named an honorary alumnus.Then and Now Memories!

Higher education leader visits campus

I. King Jordan I. King Jordan, who in 1988 became the first deaf president of Gallaudet University – the world’s only university with all programs and services designed specifically for students who are deaf and hard of hearing, will visit campus Tuesday, May 29, for a meet-and-greet and presentation. Jordan, Ph.D., president emeritus, will speak at 3 p.m. on “Diverse and Distinct: Perspectives on the Deaf and Disability Communities” in McCormick 1303.

Jordan is also the co-founder of the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD). His visit is being coordinated by the graduate students of BU’s Education of the Deaf/Hard of Hearing teacher preparation program. The event is open free to the public.

BOG scholars celebrate a busy year

Board of Governors Scholars
BU’s Board of Governors Scholars Program recently honored its 42 graduating scholars with an awards dinner and luau. In total, BU had 194 scholars this year involved in the program. A highlight of the busy year included a trip to Washington D.C. with the Office of Multicultural Affairs, where the scholars visited the Martin Luther King Jr. Monument, Lincoln Memorial, Washington Monument, White House and memorials dedicated to foreign wars such as Vietnam and World War II. Contact the Office of Diversity and Retention at (570) 389-2783 for more information on the scholars program and how to apply for a scholarship.

Duo recognized for outstanding teaching

TALE Outstanding Teachers Faculty members Nathaniel R. Greene, professor of physics and engineering technology, and Thomas J. Starmack, associate professor of educational studies and secondary education, have been selected as BU’s Teaching and Learning Enhancement (TALE) Outstanding Teachers of spring 2012. Greene and Starmack were nominated for the award by students. Each will receive a $750 professional development stipend, sponsored by the Bloomsburg University Foundation, and a plaque to recognize his achievement.See more faculty achievement

New textbook purchasing program on its way

A new process for students to purchase textbooks and other course-related materials at the University Store using excess financial aid will soon be available. Students will be able to seamlessly use their student ID to purchase textbooks and course-related materials, accessing extra financial aid up to $600 to cover the costs. This textbook purchasing program will replace the CGA Emergency Book Loans. No cash back will be given at the time of purchase.

Education students present at state technology conference

Pennsylvania Educational Technology Conference Bryan Poepperling, Amy Thomas, Stephanie Byerly, and Nicole Williams recently presented, “Beyond PowerPoint: Online Presentation Tools,” using Google Docs Presentation Tools at the Pennsylvania Educational Technology Conference in Hershey. They were introduced and assisted by Raymond Pastore, professor of educational studies and secondary education.

The presentation focused on free online presentation tools that are alternatives to PowerPoint. Each student presented and demonstrated how to use online tools along with the advantages and disadvantages the tools. The session was attended by more than 100 people.

The Pennsylvania Educational Technology Expo and Conference is a statewide conference attended by teachers, professors, administrators, technology directors, and school board members. The BU students were the only university students who did a presentation at the conference and were commended by attendees at the end of their session. (L-R) Poepperling, Thomas, Byerly, and Williams are enrolled in the educational technology minor.

Did you see the man in the dress?

Criminal Justice Research
A group of criminal justice majors, each taking Research Methods, recently presented their research on “Cell Phone Awareness” for the College of Liberal Arts on Research Day. The group tested the theory that students walking on the Quad either texting or talking on their cell phones would not notice a male student wearing a dress. The group discovered, after interviewing several students, many students didn’t notice “the man in the dress.” (L-R) Caleb Meyers, group leader, and team members Jake Charles, John Goodman III, Narissa Garber, Randyll Lloyd (who was the decoy) and Christopher Rose.

Chemistry department hosts Super Saturday event

Super Saturday
BU’s Department of Chemistry recently held its annual Super Saturday Chemistry Demonstrations for local elementary students, which were conducted by chemistry faculty and Chemistry Club members. Participating were Hannah Cronk, Owen O'Sullivan, Matt Miele, and Josie Legere, along with Luke Stauffer and Eric Hawrelak, associate professor of chemistry.

Experiments included bottle rockets, liquid nitrogen fountain, glow sticks, rainbow of fire, M&M flare, elephant toothpaste, non-burning money, indecisive thirsty chemist, disappearing styrofoam and temperature extreme explosion.

This is the life of an anthropologist

Mike Grevera
Mike Grevera, an anthropology major, has begun what he calls “a once-in-a-lifetime” experience study abroad in Costa Rica, focusing on human rights issues in Latin America, political traditions of Costa Rica and the Spanish language. According to the first few hours of his trip, this study abroad is staying true to its word. See why Grevera now claims his study abroad experience has shown him, "the life of an anthropologist." #BUAbroad

Superintendent speaks to students

David Campbell
David Campbell, superintendent of the Line Mountain School District, recently discussed curricular influences in today’s schools with two education graduate classes. In addition to talking about his personal experiences with curricular influences, Campbell answered a variety of questions on the topic from students in Frank D’Angelo’s Elementary Curriculum and Michael Ruffini’s Internet for Teachers graduate classes.

Faculty tenure and promotions announced

Carver Hall The following faculty members have been granted promotion effective fall 2012. To full professor: Betina Entzminger, English, and Michael Patte, educational studies and secondary education. To associate professor: Kevin Ball, psychology; Darla Bressler, library; Nogin Chung, art and art history; Nicole Defenbaugh, communication studies; Alan Goodboy, communication studies; Angela Hess, biological and allied health sciences; Brandon Lang, sociology, social work and criminal justice; Brett McLaurin, Envionmental, Geographical and Geological Sciences; Sue O’Donnell, art and art history; Angela Pang, exceptionality programs; Chris Podeschi, sociology, social work and criminal justice; Eric Stouffer, psychology; and Debra Stryker, exceptionality programs.

The following faculty members have been granted tenure effective fall 2012: Kevin Ball, psychology; Nogin Chung, art and art history; Nicole Defenbaugh, communication studies; Alan Goodboy, communication studies; Christian Grandzol, management; David Heineman, communication studies; Karl Henry, biological and allied health sciences; Angela Hess, biological and allied health sciences; David Huber, academic support and advisement; Angela LaValley, communication studies; Brett McLaurin, Envionmental, Geographical and Geological Sciences; Lori Metzger, nursing; Barry Nolt, biological and allied health sciences; Margaret O’Connor, business education and information and technology management; Sue O’Donnell, art and art history; Philip Osburn, chemistry; Yanhui Pang, exceptionality programs; Chris Podeschi, sociology, social work and criminal justice; Melissa Snyder, nursing; Michael Stephans, mathematics, computer science and statistics; Eric Stouffer, psychology; Deborah Stryker, exceptionality programs; Mark Usry, business law; David Walker, early childhood and adolescent education.

How to continue your academic success

Podcast Graduation is here, which means another jammed-packed semester has come to a close. Robert Marande, dean of the College of Science and Technology, explains how students can continue their academic success over the summer, as well as newly minted graduates. Marande offers some tips to keep in mind when it’s time to return in the fall, an advantage you’ll have to avoid that Finals Week study crunch. The hard work you've done this semester will serve you well.

Math major among nation’s elite

Zhaoning Yang Zhaoning Yang, a sophomore mathematics major, recently finished in the top 12 percent of the 4,440 students from 572 institutions in the United States and Canada who participated in the 2011 William Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition. Although the maximum possible score is 120; the top score on the exam was 91, and only 65 students scored 40 or greater. Yang scored 12, placing him in the top 532 contestants representing institutions including like MIT, Harvard, Cal Tech, Stanford and Princeton. #HuskyPride

Leadership group enjoys rural Poconos adventure

Presidential Leadership Program
President David L. Soltz and his wife, Robbie, who are avid horseback riders, recently helped introduce the outdoor activity to the Presidential Leadership Program during a riding excursion in the Poconos. The PLP, a scholarship program that helps further students’ leadership potential at BU, goes on a group activity each semester ending with a trip with the president in the spring. Throughout the year, the program also helps:

  • creates a rich and supportive residential learning community
  • challenges students to think critically about real-world problems
  • provides opportunities for students to develop and utilize problem-solving strategies
  • engages students on campus and in the community through meaningful service
  • enhances students' communication and career planning skills

Honors student to study in Lebanon this summer

Robert Nixon
Robert Nixon was recently selected to participate in the Lebanon Summer Fellowship program sponsored by the National Council on US-Arab Relations. This is an all-expense paid 10-day-in-country study visit. Students are expected to develop post-visit fellowship activities upon their return.

The competition was open for Model Arab League (MAL) participants across the United States based on nominations by the Advisors. Nixon, a Honors student majoring history, is the Head Delegate for the Bloomsburg MAL and has won the Outstanding Delegate Award for his representation on the Palestinian Affairs Council this academic year. #BUAbroad

“Applied Anthropology is Anthropology”

Society for Applied Anthropology 72nd Annual Meeting Anthropology faculty, Conrad Quintyn, DeeAnne Wymer and Faith Warner and students Jessica Hein, Jimmy Muwombi, Kristin Stauffer, Alexa Rose and Jessica Soroka attended the Society for Applied Anthropology 72nd Annual Meeting in Baltimore from March 27 to 31. The Society for Applied Anthropology aspires to promote the integration of anthropological perspectives and methods in solving human problems throughout the world; to advocate for fair and just public policy based upon sound research; to promote public recognition of anthropology as a profession; and to support the continuing professionalization of the field. Students presented their original research from the course Cultural Methods in Anthropology taught by Faith Warner in fall 2011 and students enrolled in the spring 2012 Applied Anthropology course participated in the conference and a special roundtable on developing applied anthropology undergraduate programs.

  • Warner, Faith; Muwombi, Jimmy; Hickman, Frank; Graham, Nathan; and Nuhfer, Jeffrey - "Community Flood Support: An Application of Public Relations Anthropology in Response to Natural Disaster"
  • Michael, Katelyn and Grevera, Michael - "Never Forget?: A Comparative Analysis of 9/11 Traumatic Stress"
  • Rose, Alexa; Warner, Faith; Magolis, David; and Yodock, Melanie - "Anthropologists and Assessment in Academia: An Application of Library Ethnography"
  • Swedo, Krystal and Hein, Jessica - "Social Support Networks and Health in Elderly Populations: An Application of Gerontology Anthropology"

Student's art speaks volumes through “Unbroken Silence”

Unbroken Silence
Brittney Logan, a senior art studio major, has created a provocative new art installation, "Unbroken Silence, now on view on the fourth floor studio space in Old Science Hall. As someone who has personally dealt with loss due to gun violence, Logan has made the issue a focus of her work. Those who come to see the exhibit should be prepared to feel a sense of loss and, Logan says a sense of urgency to do something.

"It’s easy to say if it’s not happening to me, then it’s not my problem and look the other way,” Logan says. "It's easy to ignore the issue or point fingers and blame the victims family or society rather than take a stand to stop gun violence."

"Unbroken Silence" will remain on view until Friday, May 11.
Brittany Vaszlavik

An inside-out look at ancient Rome

Brittany Vaszlavik, a senior anthropology major, got prepared for the fast-paced spring semester studying in an intense two-week course in Italy, looking at the geology and architecture of ancient Rome. The abroad program, “Underneath Rome,” enabled Vazlavik to study Speleoarchaeology. Vazlavik went underground into quarries, catacombs, multiple aqueducts and passageways that were once used by servants. She also traveled through the irrigation passage built next to Lake Nemi that went through a volcano. Vazlavik learned how to use Autocad, took measurements and were able to map out the dimensions of an underground catacomb. #BUAbroad

Honors students step to “Be Hope to Her”

Honors Program
BU’s Honors Program set out to make a difference on April 29 through the guidance of Nuru International, which enabled it to host Be Hope to Her — an awareness and fundraising event. Students and faculty had the chance to step into the shoes of Kenyan women by participating in a walk from the Quad to and back from the Susquehanna River while carrying buckets of water. The event let participants begin to understand what women in Kenya have to do on a daily basis to get water. For its first year, Be Hope to Her raised more $700 for Nuru International!

Students fulfill a Make-A-Wish

Hanna's Helpers Richard Ganahl's public relations class recently raised more than $2,000 for a Make-A-Wish child, who will be fulfilling a dream of going fishing in Hawaii. The class accepted a task in early February to raise money to help send Hanna, an 11-year-old girl from New Hope who is dealing with a life threatening illness, to Hawaii. The group, Hanna's Helpers, planned and executed different campaign strategies and events in order to raise the money. The first event was a donation table at the BU Dance Ensemble that earned the campaign over $1,100. The second event was a root beer pong tournament on campus that helped get students involved. Other events included Make-A-Wish bracelet sales and kettle corn sales. Along with other generous donations, Hanna's Helpers met and exceeded their goal. A representative from the class will hand deliver the check along with other gifts for Hanna to the Make-A-Wish Philadelphia and Susquehanna Valley offices next week.

Gender Studies graduates honored

Gender Studies
BU’s Spring 2012 Gender Studies Minor Graduation Reception was held on April 25 honoring soon-to-be graduates with the green cords. (L-R) Eva Yuen, Michele DeLuca, Olivia DeFranco, Meghan Drumheller and Kayleigh Warg. Gina Cimmino, not in the picture, is also graduating with the minor in Gender Studies.

SIFE wins regional championship

BU’s chapter of Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) recently won the Northeast Regional Championship competition in New York City out of 40 institutions from the Northeast. SIFE, which won $1,000 and a trophy, qualified to compete in the national semifinal competition on May 22 to 24 in Kansas City. In addition, the BU chapter with 51 active members was recognized with a Club 44 certificate by the president of SIFE-USA, which was followed by interviews by sponsoring companies for job openings.

Eco-Art winners announced, soon displayed

The Gift by Chello Sherman
BU’s Green Campus Initiative recently completed its annual “Eco-Art Contest,” announcing four student winners. Chello Sherman was the overall winner with “The Gift” (pictured above). Rachel Barnes, “Human Regression,” Erika Quinter, “Absence Makes he Heart Grow Fungus,” and Tyler Morrison, untitled, were chosen as runners-up.

The students' artwork had to challenge viewers to think about pressing environmental issues and/or the value and importance of the natural world. After display for one year in the Andruss Library, the winning piece will be installed permanently on campus.

Last FOCUS ministry visitation of the semester

Bethel Deliverance International BU’s Office of Minority Affairs is hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, May 6, at 10:45 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center. Free breakfast at 10:30 a.m. Altar prayers for your books, notes, projects, finals and for a safe summer at home. Free church shuttle from 10 to 11:15 a.m. at JKA and Monty's to Scranton Commons. Contact Marcei Woods at (570) 389-4091 for more information.

English students present at state conference

Sarah Halter, Emily George, Kristin Kelly
Christina Walter Sarah Halter, Emily George, Kristin Kelly and Christina Kelly presented research papers at the English Association of Pennsylvania State Universities Conference on April 7 at Kutztown University.

Kristin Kelly presented "Hindu-Muslim Conflict in Rudyard Kipling's Stories."Sarah Halter presented "An Epic Rebirth and Fall."Emily George presented "A Werewolf in Renaissance Drama: A Hairy Situation." Christina Walter presented "Understanding Plath through The Bell Jar."

TRiO SSS honors high-achievers

TRiO SSS
TRiO Student Support Services (SSS) recently held their 15th Annual Student Recognition Banquet, honoring 31 students who received certificates for attaining Dean’s List status in the fall semester. In total, 32 TRiO SSS students will graduate this month. TRiO's mission is to contribute to the success of BU students in pursuit of their educational career and life goals. TRiO is committed to increasing retention and graduation through:

  • Personalized supportive, proficient and accessible program services and staff
  • Quality advising, tutoring, teaching and advocacy
  • Acknowledgement and appreciation for individual diversity and resilience

A time to turn "Trash To Treasure"

Trash To Treasure
It’s time to cash in on some spring cleaning at BU with its annual Trash To Treasure event on Saturday, May 19, from 9 a.m. to noon, in KUB Multicultural Center. Computers, furniture, electronics and household appliances will all be offered. Tickets for the early bird sale, 8 to 9 a.m., are $5. Call (570) 784-3134 for more information.

Administrative Professionals Symposium

BU professionals gather for symposium

BU’s Administrative Professionals Symposium, organized by the BU Secretarial Roundtable and BU Foundation, was recently held at Ponduce Farm Farms in Numidia. Shown are most of the 85 attendees, who enjoyed presentations by Al Fundaburk, of BU's College of Business, Eileen Chapman, of AGAPE, and international speaker Tammy Miller.

Faculty Scholarship

Faculty honored for scholarly work

Four faculty were recently presented with the Provost's Award for Excellence in Research and Scholarly Activity. Shown from left are: Ira K. Blake, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs; Mindi Miller; associate professor of nursing; Edward Pitingolo, associate professor of accounting; Yanghui Pang, assistant professor of exceptionality programs; Kevin Ball, assistant professor of psychology; President David L. Soltz. Each award winner received $1,000 for travel or other faculty development activities and a plaque.

Nominations of untenured faculty are made by each dean and evaluated by Dean's Council based upon publications, presentations and other scholarly work.

Sutliff Hall

BU dedicates ‘new’ Sutliff Hall

More than 200 alums and their families joined Bloomsburg University’s celebration Friday, April 27, of the reopening of Sutliff Hall — home of the College of Business, Department of Instructional Technology and Department of Economics. Sutliff Hall reopened in March following a $10 million renovation featuring expanded conference rooms, state-of-the-art classrooms and a Wall Street-inspired financial services laboratory equipped with real-time tickers and a trading wall with market information and stock quotes.

A big success for CGA's The Big Event


The Big Event A misty rain and chilly temperatures didn’t dampen the #HuskySpirit of more than 700 students who volunteered Saturday, March 31, for the third annual Big Event, coordinated by the Community Government Association (CGA). Students broke out into several groups spread across the Town of Bloomsburg, including large pockets along West 3rd Street, Main Street and Town Park. Among the community projects included painting, raking leaves, pulling shrubs, washing windows, moving flood-related debris and trimming bushes. #CGABigEvent

Take Back the Night with a MTV reality star

Take Back the Night
Sarah Rice, a former MTV Real World cast member, will discuss the importance of shattering the silence surrounding sexual violence as part of the BU Women’s Center annual Take Back the Night event on Wednesday, April 11, at 7 p.m. in Centennial Hall 239. She will share her story as a survivor of sexual abuse and provide insight on healing and raising awareness. A candlelight vigil will follow.

On an exclusive sideline with J. Cole

J. Cole
Lauren Grose, a sophomore mass communications and English major, scored an exclusive interview with J. Cole prior to his concert on April 26 at Nelson Field House. Grose, who also photographed J. Cole’s performance from the stage media pit, had 10 minutes with the Grammy nominated hip hop artist to find out what inspires him, his expectations of the music industry and his reflections of being a music artist and a college graduate.

An artful send-off for seniors

Senior Exit Show
BU’s Senior Exit Show reception will be held Tuesday, May 1, from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. with a student art exhibit that will remain on display in the Haas Art Gallery through spring commencement. At the exit show, art students will give presentations about their work. Participants include Rachel Etzweiler, art history and art studio; Andrew Bull, art history; Megan Koontz, art history; Olivia DeFranco, art studio; Melanie Ortiz, art studio; Lena Kurtz, art studio; Megan Combs, art studio; Brittney Logan, art studio and Kyle Gosson, art studio.

Military Appreciation Day set for the Quad

BU Student Veteran's Association BU's Student Veteran's Association will honor local veterans, military personnel and their families, including those represented on campus, during its second annual Military Appreciation Day on Wednesday, April 25, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the Academic Quad. The celebration will include guest speakers, a food eating contest with prizes — such as local gift cards — a cookout, raffles, lawn games and team-building activities with BU Quest.

Guest speakers include Allan Schappert, a former B-52 bomber pilot in Vietnam, and Michael Tidwell, dean of the College of Business. A 40-foot recreational vehicle equipped with a sound system, video games and other interactive entertainment will be on site courtesy of the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs. Express your gratitude to local veterans, including BU's own, at #BUSVA.

Students showcase fashionable creativity

BU’s eighth annual Personal Adornment Day will be held Thursday, April 26, featuring a lecture, workshop and its much anticipate runway show that showcases students’ creativity through wearable art and makeup. A lecture, from 9:45 to 11 a.m., and workshop, noon to 4 p.m., will be held in Old Science Hall 311. The runway show will take place at 5:30 p.m. at The Moose Exchange, 203 W. Main St.

Jan Myers-Newbury, an internationally known art quilter, will the lecture and workshop. Personal Adornment Day is a part of BU’s new Center for Visual and Performing Arts. Anyone interested in participating in the workshop must contact Meredith Grimsely at (570) 389-4853 to preregister.

Dance students to showcase their talents

Repertory/Ensemble Dance Minor Concert "New Heights" is promised with BU's second annual Repertory/Ensemble Dance Minor Concert will be held on Sunday, April 29, at 3 p.m., and monday, April 30, at 7:30 p.m. in the Haas Center for the Arts. Concerts will include dance intensity, precision, excitement and creativity. Also featured will be costume, make-up and lighting designs by students and faculty. Choreography will be done by Jenna Introna, Marcedes Kennedy, Michelle Megill, Olivia Naugle, Amber Nicole and Julie Petry. Both concerts are open free to the public.

ICS honors faculty for scholarly contributions

ICS Awards
BU’s Institute for Culture and Society is hosting its 2012 Awards Presentations on Thursday, April 26, at 3:30 p.m. in McCormick 1316 where it will honor Betina Entzminger with the Outstanding Scholarship Award, Steven Ekema Agbaw with the Lifetime Achievement Award and Jason Godeke with the Vermont Studio Center Fellowship Award.

  • Entzminger, associate professor of English, is being recognized for her scholarly excellence exhibited with through published works.
  • Agbaw, professor of English, is being recognized for his continuous professional contribution to scholarship and professional work inside and outside of BU.
  • Godeke, associate professor of art and art history, receives a four-week residency for creative research in art and writing.

Future diplomats get a taste of international relations

Model United Nations BU’s Model United Nations recently hosted more than 120 high school students for a conference simulating a real United Nations, where the students discussed various international topics from the view of difference countries. Topics included:

  • Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All its Aspects
  • Nuclear Proliferation in the Middle East
  • Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Children
  • International Drug Control

In addition, the students learned about the UN process and met George Agbango, professor of political science who in 1981 was a delegate of Ghana in the UN. (L-R) Matt Albertson, Kelly Murray, Tim Crossett, Jesse Gomez, Dave Yael, Jessica Martin, Eric Petrozino, Abbi Grabowski, Jaimie Hoffman, Chris Gsell, Danielle Rodriguez, Emma Worrall, ASM Tuhin and Ladashia Maxwell.

Audiology major wins Cynthia Schloss Graduate Student Award

Nicole Leonzi
Nicole Leonzi ’10, a graduate student working toward a doctoral degree in audiology, is the 2011-12 recipient of The Cynthia Schloss Graduate Student Award. Leonzi, of Summit Hill, was described as the student “who most exemplifies the qualities that Dr. Schloss held most dear.”

To be eligible for the Schloss Award, students must be enrolled in special education, reading, education of the deaf/hard of hearing, speech pathology or audiology graduate programs. Students must have earned a minimum of 12 credits with a GPA of at least 3.5. The $1,000 award is given annually during the spring semester in honor of Schloss, who was a faculty member in BU’s exceptionalities department. #HuskyPride

Student honors research on display

Twenty-three Honors students will showcase their independent research projects through presentations in the coming days in the Honors Lab within Luzerne Hall, beginning Tuesday, April 17, through Thursday, May 3. Honors students take two three-credit independent study courses at BU where they work with a faculty mentor to complete a year-long research project. The final piece of their assessment is a 30-minute oral presentation along with a written research paper, which is open for submission for publication. Presentation Schedule | #BUResearch

Student lands Washington D.C. internship

The Washington Center Ryan Ammermann, a computer forensics major, was recently selected as one of the recipients of The Washington Center’s Motorola Scholarship. This $5,000 award is funded by the Motorola Solutions Foundation and BAE Systems, and competitively awarded to students in The Washington Center’s Science, Technology and Society Program who are pursuing degrees in the STEM majors. Priority consideration is given to students who intern in the public or nonprofit sector.

BU hosts Biology Honor Society convention

Tri-Beta Convention BU’s Rho Chi Chapter of Beta Beta Beta, the Biology Honor Society, recently hosted the Northeast District 2 Convention with more than 80 students and faculty representing 13 institutions spanning four stats. Participants enjoyed a day of oral and poster presentation and workshops. The keynote address, CSI:Ancient Egypt, was delivered by Stephen Phillips, from the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania.

Meghan Duell, a senior biology major, won the Frank G. Brooks Award, the first place prize in the oral presentation category. Duell is eligible to compete next month at the National Tri-Beta Convention in Puerto Rico. Her presentation “Honeybee Stress: Behavioral & Physiological Implications of Flumethrin Treatment.” John Hranitz, professor biological and allied health sciences, is her mentor.

Brandon Dunbar, a senior biology major, received second prize in the poster category. He presented “Effect of Composted Materials on the Incidence of Pythium splendans induced-root rot disease.” His mentors are Barry Nolt, assistant professor, and Judith Kipe-Nolt, professor of biological and allied health sciences.

Students rally for justice in Martin slaying

Trayvon Martin Rally BU students joined in nation-wide rallies on Monday, March 26, for slain Florida teenager, Trayvon Martin, as rumors his shooting was racially motivated continue to fuel anger. Police in Florida say Martin was shot and killed after some sort of confrontation with 28-year old George Zimmerman, who is a crime watch volunteer in that gated community. Students say they are upset by how this case is being handled. “The issue that we have going on in today`s society where the difference between a black man wearing a hoodie in today`s society and white, Latino, Asian man wearing a hoodie,” said Marcus Scales, graduate student, according to WNEP's news report. #TrayvonMartin

Chi Theta Pi helps families of hospital patients

Chi Theta Pi Chi Theta Pi recently collected 10 pounds of soda can tabs to help aid the Ronald McDonald House at Geisinger Medical Center in Danville, which provides a home-away-from-home for families of children being hospitalized or receiving outpatient care at area hospitals. It’s a place of comfort and stability offering families the opportunity to relax and be together as a family unit during a time of great uncertainty.

The Ronald McDonald House collects soda can tabs instead of entire aluminum cans, because it's more hygienic to store tabs than cans, and collection and storage is easier. The program is an easy way for people of all ages to support the Ronal McDonald House and know they are making a difference for families and children. Pictured is Sara Kaufman, of Chi Theta Pi. #BUGreekLife

Inch honored by TechQuest

Scott Inch Scott Inch, professor of mathematics, computer science and statistics, recently was named TechQuest Pennsylvania’s 2012 Technology Educator of the Year. Winners were recognized in 11 categories during a ceremony in Harrisburg’s Whitaker Center for the Arts and Sciences. More than 100 statewide organizations and individuals submitted over 200 nominations for this year’s Pennsylvania Tech Awards. Inch’s award, Technology Educator of the Year, was presented by Gannett Fleming, and finalists were Andy Petroski, director of learning technologies at Harrisburg University, and Lisa Butler, Spanish techbook creator and Hershey Middle School Spanish teacher.

Inch developed and teaches the courses in BU’s bachelor’s degree in computer forensics program. The program prepares students for careers extracting and analyzing information from computers, cell phones and similar devices involved in criminal activity. As computer forensics specialists, they may be employed with law enforcement, homeland security agencies, law firms or private companies. #HuskyPride

Senior among finalists for PASSHE award

Katherine Zimmerman Katherine Zimmerman, a senior elementary and special education major, was recently named a finalist for the Syed R. Ali-Zaidi Award for Academic Excellence, awarded by the PASSHE Board of Governors’ Academic and Student Affairs Committee.

Zimmerman earns a $500 scholarship along with recognition during the April meeting of the Board of Governors. David Walton, a Millersville student, won the award and earned a $1,000 scholarship, along with a commemorative medallion. Ali-Zaidi, a charter member of PASSHE’s Board of Governors, established the award to inspire and honor System students who excel in the pursuit of knowledge.

Students add voice to local Town Hall meeting

PCN Students from George Agbango's "Nations, States, and Government" course comprised the bulk of the audience at the Pennsylvania Cable Network’s new congressional district Town Hall meeting on Tuesday, April 17, at the Alumni House. Discussing the local congressional issues were guest panelists: Pedro Anés, president/CEO of the Latino American Alliance of Northeastern PA; Bill O’Boyle, reporter for the Wilkes-Barre Times Leader; Borys Krawczeniuk, of the Times-Shamrock Newspapers; and Neil Strine, chair of BU’s political science department. See how well the political science students represented BU and their department by interacting with the panel!

Senior a finalist for PASSHE competition

Andrew Milner Andrew Milner, senior business management major, was selected as one of the six finalists for the PASSHE Student Business Plan Competition, which was created last year through a Keystone Innovation Grant. Jonathan Weber, of East Stroudsburg, was chosen as the winner.

The competition gives a new generation of business an opportunity to advance their entrepreneurial business plans with support from the PA Community and Economic Development fund and PASSHE institutions.

The competition was open to the 120,000 students enrolled in the PASSHE system. A total of 236 students submitted business ideas and of those entries, 25 business venture profiles were selected as semi-finalists. Judges from all across the state reviewed the 25 semi-finalists and selected six finalists. #HuskyPride

Wear blue for World Autism Awareness Day

Autism Speaks U BU’s chapter of Autism Speaks U is coordinating a group photo Monday, April 2, at 1 p.m. on the Academic Quad. The campus community is encouraged to participate. The goal is to get at least 200 participants to “Light It Up Blue.” Autism is a disorder of neural development characterized by impaired social interaction and communication, and by restricted and repetitive behavior. The prevalence of autism is about 1 to 2 per 1,000 people worldwide, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report 11.3 per 1,000 children in the U.S. are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.

FOCUS ministry highlights siblings service

Bethel Deliverance International BU’s Office of Minority Affairs is hosting Martin Harris, Sr., pastor of F.O.C.U.S. Young Adult Ministry at Bethel Deliverance International in Philadelphia for an on-campus church visit on Sunday, April 15, at 10:45 a.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center. Free breakfast at 10:30 a.m. Bring your siblings along for the service! Church visitation shuttle will be running a continuous loop on lower and upper campus from 9:45 to 11 a.m. Contact Marcei Woods at (570) 389-4091 for more information.

Students organize Hacky House fundraiser

Hacky House Fundraiser BU's Student Council for Exceptional Children is hosting a Hacky House supply drive across campus. The house is used during the day for a life skills class from Danville High School. Boxes will be placed throughout campus to collect household items such as; hair dryers, towels, wash cloth’s measuring spoons and dish towels etc.

Hacky House is a house owned by the Grove Presbyterian Church in Danville. Used as a meeting place for the youth of the church, it was named in memory of David Hackenberg, a Sunday school teacher and youth group advisor. Hacky House is now also being used during the day by the life skills class from the Danville High School. The staff and students have been working hard to transform Hacky House into a real home where the students can better learn the skills they will need in the future.

Phi Beta Lambda has impressive showing

Phi Beta Lambda
BU’s Future Business Leaders, Phi Beta Lambda, recently sent 10 members and one adviser to the Phi Beta Lambda State Leadership Conference in Gettysburg. All attendees competed against other chapters of Phi Beta Lambda throughout the state. Jeremy Rhen won first place in Business Law. Bryce Liggins won first place in Marketing Concepts. Carol Bachman won second place in Future Business Teacher, and Tim Smeltzer won third place in Accounting Analysis and Decision Making. The club’s advisor, Edward Pitingolo, was awarded Advisor of the Year.

Pre-Med March Madness

Pre-Med March Madness BU’s Pre-professional Advisory Committee is hosting a series of workshops in the coming weeks for students interested in careers in various medical-related professions such as medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine and optometry. Workshops will be held at 5 p.m. in the Living Learning Community Room in Columbia Hall.

  • Wednesday, March 21 — We’ll guide you through the rigors of applying to professional schools, including AMCAS. Students will share their experiences with the admissions process.
  • Wednesday, March 28 — Creating an Appropriate Resume: Sure you have a resume, but is it appropriate for your application? Come to this workshop with a print out of your resume for break-out sessions of peer and advisor review. It is OK if the resume is kind of rough. Sophomores are especially encouraged to attend.
  • Wednesday, April 4 — Telling Your Story in the Personal Statement: Writing about yourself is probably the most difficult part of the application. For that reason, applicants tend to procrastinate in writing this important document. Come to this workshop with a printed rough draft of your personal statement, or at least some ideas on paper for break out sessions of peer and advisor review. Juniors are especially encouraged to come.

New bachelor's program formalized

BU President David Soltz and Donald Snyder, president of Lehigh Carbon Community College, signed an agreement Thursday, March 29, formalizing BU’s Bachelor of Applied Science in Technical Leadership, which will be offered at LCCC’s campus starting this fall. The Bachelor of Applied Science in Technical Leadership, the first in PASSHE, addresses the growing demand for technical skills combined with professional skills. A student who has earned an Associate of Applied Science degree from a community college will build upon that degree with courses in information technology, communications studies, accounting, business education, information and technology management and general education. The program also will be open to those already in the workforce.

FDI Conference seeks student participation

Undergraduate Interdisciplinary Conference Students are encourage to submit research ideas for the Frederick Douglass Undergraduate Interdisciplinary Conference, which will be held from April 19 to 20, focused on the theme, “Consumption.” Students may interpret this in a variety of ways and approach it from any discipline, such as consumption of natural resources, consumerism and economics, as well as consumption of images and media. Students should submit a description of their project, a title, and their contact information to Tina Entzminger at any time before Monday, April 2. Students may read papers, give PowerPoint presentations, give talks, or participate in a poster session.

BU’s Frederick Douglass Institute for Academic Excellence is collaborating with the Campus Green Initiative and its Earth Day activities for the conference. In addition to keynote speaker, David Guggenheim, the conference will host several other Green topic presentations and speakers.

Hope for Hanna approaches $1,500 goal

Hanna's Helpers Hanna’s Helpers, students from Richard Ganahl’s Public Relations: Cases and Problems class, recently raised $1,090.16 for the Make-A-Wish Foundation. For their final project, they teamed with the Make-A-Wish Foundation and are working towards raising $1,500 to help send their wisher, Hanna, to Hawaii. Hanna is an 11-year-old girl from New Hope who has been diagnosed with Pilocytic Astrocytoma. She likes the color green, Titanic, monopoly, drawing, cookies, Macy's, Blues music, Food network, tennis, fishing, and zombies! She cannot wait to go to Hawaii.

Hanna’s Helpers were able to raise $375 by selling flowers and taking cash donations at the Dance Ensemble Spring Show on March 22, followed by $715.16 on March 23 at its second show by selling flowers and Make-A-Wish bracelets. Hanna’s Helpers include Richard Ganahl, David Abrams, Jenna Castrovillari, Ashley DeBaro, Elisha Garcia, LaShae Green, Andrew Greer, Ashley Kuenzie, Maurya Matylewicz, Alexandra Palmeri, Olivia Plantholt, Alethea Ramsey, Allison Ray, Paul Rosa, Sean Roth, Carl Shultz, Devin Simmons, Kelsey Steen, Megan Tatge, Sarie Tocket, Lindsey Ulmer, Peter Vaughn, and Rebecca Vernon. Contact Richard Ganahl for details, including how to donate.

How do you see BU?

How do you see BU? As we strive to meet the goals of our Strategic Plan: Impact 2015, the marketing and communications team has been meeting with students, faculty, staff, administrators and alumni to formulate a singular vision and specific messages to ensure success. As the next step, we are inviting you to provide your opinion of BU’s mission, core values, strengths and strategic direction via this short web-based marketing survey.

The survey is 14 questions and takes 5 to 10 minutes to complete. The information collected will help us to better understand the university’s reputation, strengths and weaknesses; enhance our current recruitment and branding strategies; and create a solid baseline of research for the future. With this data we will be better able to:

  • Communicate more effectively with elected officials, our peer institutions and opinion leaders
  • Enhance institutional and alumni pride
  • Support our Strategic Enrollment Management efforts to attract the best and brightest students

More information about our branding efforts can be found at www.bloomu.edu/Inner_Husky. Thank you for your support and participation.

2012 Presidential Grant Recipients

Strategic Planning

Six projects were announced Thursday, April 12, by President David L. Soltz as recipients of $113,725 in 2012 Presidential Grant Awards as part of the ongoing initiatives of Impact 2015: Building on the Past, Leading for the Future.

  • Ned Greene, professor of physics and engineering technology, and John Holtzman, assistant facilities director for energy and environment — $25,000 for campus-wide energy monitoring and efficiency initiative
  • Tom Fletcher, associate dean of extended programs, Steve Kokoska, director of Honors Program, and Irvin Wright, associate dean of academic achievement — $25,000 for The Educational Pathways Initiative
  • John Hranitz, professor of biological and allied health science — $24,680 for initiation of a Center for Undergraduate Research and Education in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics
  • Heather Feldhaus, chairperson of sociology, social work and criminal justice, and Christopher Podeschi, assistant professor of sociology, social work and criminal justice — $23,915 for the Center for Community Research and Consulting
  • John Polhill, assistant dean of College of Science and Technology, and Jennifer Venditti, assistant professor of biology — $10,000 for Summer STEM Enrichment Program
  • John Huckans, assistant professor for physics and engineering technology — $5,130 for environmental impact assessment of the Bloomsburg WindJET

Share your experiences and be heard!

Campus Climate Survey BU’s campus climate survey was distributed via email last week to all members of the campus community. Responses to the survey will help us to understand the issues important to a broad cross section of students, staff, faculty and administrators. The goal is to build an inclusive climate and, to do so, we need your input! Please take advantage of this opportunity to share your experiences with and perceptions of diversity on our campus.

    — David L. Soltz, President

Campus Alert: Sunday, April 22, 2012

Update: The suspect in this incident is known by the name “Maine.” Anyone with information should contact BU Police at (570) 389-4168.

A rape occurred at Mount Olympus Apartments at about 4 a.m. today. An unknown black male, described as being in his early 20s with a thin build, approached the victim at the front door of her apartment and asked to use a cell phone charger. The victim let the man inside the apartment and, once inside, he raped the victim. No weapons were seen. A suspect has been preliminarily identified, but is not in custody. The incident was reported to BU Police today at about 10:30 a.m.

Always be vigilant of your surroundings, do not walk alone and be careful about whom you invite into your apartment or room. If you feel threatened or uncomfortable about a situation do not hesitate to notify police. The university recommends students walk in groups and keep a cell phone readily accessible.

Also, consider carrying a whistle. While there are limitations to the effectiveness of a whistle against all threats, it could work well in a difficult situation as students would first blow into the whistle to attract help and then use a cell phone to call for help. For your safety, there are emergency call boxes available throughout campus. If you are in town and need help call 911. This campus alert is issued in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police and Crime Statistics Act of 1990.

Relay for Life

BU's Relay for Life raises nearly $25,000!

Relay for Life Spending time with friends and sharing the experience not only creates a memory, it can help the fight against cancer. More than 575 people on 51 teams participated in BU’s Relay for Life on Friday, March 23, through Saturday, March 24, and raised $24,931 for the American Cancer Society to help fund cancer research and treatment. Thanks in large part to the generous contributions to Relay For Life, the American Cancer Society is saving lives by helping people stay well and get well, by finding cures, and by fighting back.

Students network with COST alumni

COST Career Day
More than 50 alumni joined faculty and students for the College of Science and Technology Career Day on Friday, March 2, in the Kehr Union Building. Alumni discussed their work experiences and met in small groups with students, who got an inside look into the career fields of geography, exercise science, computer forensics, math and physics, computer science, engineering, nursing, biology,

COST alumni return for Career Day

Podcast BU’s College of Science and Technology is hosting a Career Day on Friday, March 2, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the KUB Ballroom for its students and roughly 50 returning alumni, who will serve as presenters and panelists. John Polhill, assistant dean, says the event is a great opportunity for students to directly network with alumni who are working in prospective career fields for advice, paths to internships and as possible references. Career Day is also an opportune time for students, especially freshmen and sophomores, to get insight on getting the most out of their college experience and getting ready for post-graduate life, including graduate school and research opportunities.
 

Empty Bowls benefit local food cupboard

Empty Bowls BU's annual Empty Bowls Banquet is observing its 10th anniversary of serving soup to draw attention to local hunger. This year’s banquet will be held on Sunday April 1, from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. in Bloomsburg University’s Kehr Union Ballroom. This fundraising event benefits the Bloomsburg Food Cupboard and is sponsored by the SOLVE volunteer office. The Empty Bowls Banquet event includes a dessert sale, entertainment and children’s activities. The bowls used to serve the community are handmade by local artists. The minimum donation is $5 for BU students, $10 for adults and free for children under 5.

Nursing students win competition

Student Nurse Challenge
A group of BU nursing students recently won the Geoffrey Allen Walp Memorial 9th Annual Student Nurse Challenge, based on the College Bowl program. The competition is sponsored by the East Stroudsburg University chapter of the Student Nurse Association of Pennsylvania (SNAP) and helps prepare student nurses to pass the National Council Licensure Examination for their registered nurse license.

All schools in the SNAP district, including diploma, associate and baccalaureate programs are invited to participate. BU students won a $500 check for their SNAP chapter and the right to house the trophy until next year’s challenge. (L-R) Ashley Ginther and Amanda Cruz (holding trophy), Allison Maloney (faculty advisor), Jen McCauley, Rachel Crawford, Emily Searfoss, Nikki Cicero, Amanda Nyce, and Mindi Miller (faculty advisor), Jamie Thomas, Kayla Zambiasi, Rebecca Gates and guest Kasey Cicero.

BU hosts Law Enforcement Career Day

Law Enforcement Career Day
Jay Dobyns Representatives of the FBI, Homeland Security, Federal Air Marshalls and PA State Police will be in attendance at BU’s Law Enforcement Career Day on Thursday, March 29, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., in the KUB Multicultural Center. Joining them will be federal corrections, Allentown and Baltimore police, among others.

The day will be highlighted by federal agent, Jay Dobyns, who will discuss his experiences as an undercover agent, including infiltrating the famed Hells Angels, at 7 p.m. in Carver Hall’s Gross Auditorium. All events are open free to the public and campus community.

In addition, the Baltimore Police Department will be giving the civil service exam and physical agility test at 8 a.m., Saturday, March 31, at the Nelson Field House to start the hiring process to be a police officer. Events are sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts and the Department of Sociology, Social Work and Criminal Justice.

Be a part of Leckey Live on Newswatch 16

Leckey Live
Unleash Your Inner Husky on Thursday, March 29, from 5 to 9 a.m. as part of a live WNEP broadcast from Nelson Field House. All BU students are invited to join members of CGA, Greeks and student athletes for Leckey Live on Newswatch 16 This Morning. The focus is on fun as BU spreads the word about the March 31 Big Event community service project. Games, prizes and free T-shirts while supplies last. Get up early to show your Husky Pride. Contact Dave Abrams, CGA president, for more information.

A deeper look at local natural gas drilling

Marcellus Shale BU’s Green Campus Initiative, the Institute for Culture and Society, the Institute for Human Rights and Social Justice, the College of Science and Technology and the College of Liberal Arts are sponsoring a series of lectures and documentaries on the impacts of drilling for natural gas in the Marcellus Shale. The events, slated for Tuesday, March 20, through Thursday, March 29, will explore the social, economic and environmental impacts of natural gas extraction.

Individual events will include:

  • An overview of the natural gas extraction and the process of hydrofracking
  • A discussion of natural gas drilling and the disposal of frackwater in Ohio
  • A screening of the documentary "Crude"
  • A discussion of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection’s role in the regulation of natural gas drilling and the disposal of frackwater
  • A screening of the documentary “Gasland”
  • A discussion of impacts of Marcellus natural gas development on housing in Pennsylvania
  • A discussion of the social impacts of population influx associated with tar sands mining in Alberta, Canada
  • And a Screening of the documentary “Petropolis”

The 10 day event will conclude on Thursday, March 29th with a panel discussion on natural gas drilling in the Marcellus Shale with representatives from industry, academia and government. All events are open free to the public.

CGA leaders lend hand to Katrina relief

Community Government Association BU’s Community Government Association Executive Board recently spent time in New Orleans for an American Student Government Association conference, as well as community service in the form of rebuilding a house damaged during Hurricane Katrina. The house was severely damaged during the hurricane and is still in the demolition phase. The executive board spent time working hard to continue the process.

CGA's work included taking out light fixtures, removing walls and tearing down cabinetry. After eight hours of work, the demolition phase was nearly complete. Work will continue to be done on this house for several months until it’s in livable condition. The CGA partnered with the St. Bernard Project, a non-profit organization located in New Orleans. #BUServes

Paying respect to a pioneering Husky

George “Chubb” Young
BU alum George “Chubb” Young ’51 passed away Wednesday, March 21, at the age of 88 in his hometown of Danville. Young, a World War II veteran, was the first African-American male to graduate from Bloomsburg, when in 1951 he earned a bachelor’s in education from what was then Bloomsburg State Teachers College. He spent the next 39 years as an elementary teacher and principal in East Orange, N.J. Although not the first African-American to attend Bloomsburg, he set the standard that many additional young men and women over the past 60 years have equaled and made their Alma Mater proud. A memorial service with military honors will be held Friday, March 30, in Danville where Young will be laid to rest in Odd Fellows Cemetery.

“Blinking Nebula” research gets published

Nada Jevtic and Peter Stine Nada Jevtic, Ph.D., assistant professor of physics and engineering technology, and Peter Stine, Ph.D., professor and chair of physics and engineering technology, recently had their research, “Stochastic Brightness Variations in the Central Star of Planetary Nebula NGC 6826” accepted for publication by the Astrophysical Journal. NGC 6826 is commonly known as the “Blinking Nebula.” The research paper deals with a novel application of nonlinear time series analysis to Kepler Space Telescope light curve data. The Astrophysical Journal is one of the most eminent journals for astronomy and astrophysics.

What a strong China Means to the U.S.

Sheng Ding Sheng Ding, associate professor of political science, was recently interviewed by China Radio International about his perspective on U.S.-China relations and Vice President Xi Jinping’s ongoing visit to the U.S. Jinping is set to become the next President of China and Secretary General of Chinese Communist Party this fall. China Radio International is one of the three state-owned media in China. It has broadcasts 1,520 hours of programs each day all over the world in 61 languages.Listen to Ding's Radio Interview!

Investing: Risky business, like it or not

Rand Martin Using the words investing and risk in the same sentence makes some cringe. Risk, however, comes hand in hand with investing if you want to accumulate assets — of course, some decisions carry more risk than others. In this interview with Bankrate.com, Rand Martin, Ph.D., professor finance discusses risk, accumulating retirement assets, diversification and common mistakes that investors make.

Professional mountain climber discusses "Leadership in the Mountains"

Craig John Mountain climber and guide Craig John, of Freeport, Maine, will offer a multimedia presentation about leading and guiding worldwide at Columbia Hall on Wednesday, March 28, at 7 p.m. on his “Seven Competencies of Leadership.” John uses the seven competencies — passion, organization, creativity, support and learning, reliability, competency and recognition — to build teams that work together to achieve a common goal and problem solve effectively. He will discuss his ascent of the North Ridge of Mount Everest, as well as expeditions to mountains such as Kilimanjaro, Denali and Cho Oyu, and how the lessons he’s learned on the mountains apply to becoming stronger, more competent individuals in daily life.

Biologists gather on campus

The Bloomsburg University chapter of the biology honor society Beta Beta Beta is hosting the Northeast District 2 Convention in Hartline Science Center on Saturday, March 24. More than 75 students and faculty from 13 regional colleges and universities will attend. Welcoming remarks will be delivered at 9 a.m. by BU President David Soltz and Dean Robert Marande. This will be followed by nearly 30 research posters and oral presentations. Also included is a workshop entitled "How to Succeed in Graduate and Medical School" that will feature a panel of alumni from the Department of Biological and Allied Health Sciences (Jason Nolt, Michael Busada, and Laura McCourt). The keynote address, "CSI-Ancient Egypt,” will be presented at 3:30 p.m. in Hartline room 108 by Dr. Stephen R. Phillips from the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania.

Professor discusses philosophy of religion

Jack Call Jack Call, Ph.D., an author and philosophy professor at Citrus College (Calif.), will be giving a free public talk on Monday, March 26, from 2 to 3 p.m. in SSC 004. His talk cover the philosophy of religion involving his book, “God is a Symbol of Something True: Why You Don't Have to Choose Either a Literal Creator or a Blind, Indifferent Universe.” Call has published essays on the relations between philosophy, religion and social science in The National Social Science Journal and authored, "Cloning Human Beings," in The Encyclopedia of Civil Liberties.

Not your typical Gen Ed ... it’s MyCore

MyCore Presentation BU’s new general education program, MyCore, was recently highlighted during the AASCU winter meeting. BU’s innovative program adopts a new model that emphasizes the connectedness of disciplines, knowledge and skills, and recognizes the achievement of general education outcomes outside the traditional classroom. Its biggest change is the adoption of a point system, independent of the academic credit system that allows any course or co-curricular activity to contribute to gen ed outcomes. MyCore, which emphasizes student ownership of the way they achieve gen ed goals, will go in effect for summer and new freshmen.

Now THIS is how government works

THIS Internship George Specht, a junior political economics major, is one of 14 PASSHE students participating in The Harrisburg Internship Semester (THIS) program this spring. Specht is getting the opportunity to work in all areas of state government while earning a full semester’s worth of credits. Specifically, he is working for the state House of Representatives Speaker Sam Smith, R-Jefferson, for the next 15 weeks. Additionally, he and the other participating students will attend several academic seminars and complete an individualized research project.

More than 500 students have participated in THIS since the program began in 1989, each gaining valuable insight into the workings of state government at the policy-making level. Interns have worked with dozens of state agencies, as well as in the offices of the governor, the speaker of the House of Representatives and the attorney general. For more information on THIS opportunity contact Sheng Ding at (570) 389-4336.

Greek Life leads Fishing Creek clean up

Phi Sigma Sigma
Greek Life recently helped clear the areas surrounding flood-ravaged Fishing Creek along with several other BU organizations and volunteers. Students picked up everything from roof shingles to smashed televisions, broken glass, pipes and flood-related house damage Collectively, the volunteers filled more than 10 trash bags with debris and organized larger pieces, such as large metal pipes, for collection.

Among the more than 125 volunteers included Chi Sigma Rho, Phi Sigma Sigma, Kappa Sigma, Alpha Sigma Tau, Alpha Phi Omega, Honors Program, Biology Club, Helping Professions LLC, Health Sciences LLC, Social Justice and Sustainability LLC and several other students volunteering on their own. #BUServes

Senior to perform research project

Black Voices Natasha Willis, a senior theatre performance major, will present “Black Voices: A Timeline of Black Life in America” on Monday, March 5, at 7 p.m. in the KUB Multicultural Center. Willis will present her Senior Capstone project with an evening reading authentic slave narratives and self-written monologues. The characters of each reading piece will be representing the African American experience in America at different points in history, ranging from pre-colonial West Africa to Post Civil Rights America circa 1975.

German Club brings traveling photo exhibition

Weisse Rose
A touring photo exhibition, White Rose, will visit campus from March 19 through March 30 at the KUB Multicultural Center. The exhibition chronicles the brief yet intense bloom of the White Rose (Weisse Rose) resistance movement against the Nazi regime. The White Rose was formed by a small group of university students in 1942-43 in Munich, Germany. This group actively fought against the oppression of civil liberties and the persecution of Jews, and demanded an end to the war.

There will be a seminar on the White Rose on Tuesday, March 27, from 4 to 6 p.m. in the Multicultural Center. Students from Luke Springman's German courses will be giving presentations. While the exhibition is on campus the German Club will be showing two related films, "Die Weisse Rose" and "Sophie Scholl: The Final Days."

Art studio student designs thoughts into “Words”

Lena Kurtz was the latest art studio major to showcase work at Old Science Hall. Kurtz described her installation, “Words,” as “one of those moments when someone says something to you and you aren’t really sure what it means, and a million ideas of what it meant fly into your head.” According to Kurtz, the installation represented her mind processing words and how one word’s meaning can change in her head until she can’t decide what the person who spoke it really meant. Look for more student art to be displayed on campus this spring semester.

Campus blood drive to save more than 800 lives

Blood Drive
Nearly 60 first-time blood donors were drawn to BU’s latest campus blood drive (Feb. 14 and 15), adding to the 271 pints of blood collected for the local chapter of the American Red Cross. According to organizers, 813 lives will be saved by this recent campus blood drive. BU will host its next blood drive on Tuesday, April 17, from 1 to 7 p.m., in the KUB Ballroom. #BUServes

Forensic Team continues success

Mary Pellant and Erika Mohr, senior political science majors, recently won the Parliamentary Debate at the Pennsylvania Forensic Association’s 2012 Championship Tournament at Cedar Crest College. Overall, BU won the fifth place sweepstakes trophy and second place in the President’s sweepstakes at the state tournament. Dan Clark and Nicholas Foreman also competed at the PA State Championship tournament for BU, while Neil Strine, director of forensics, served as a judge at the tournament.

Most recently, the Forensics Team captured the sixth place team award at the Collegiate Forensic Association’s Annual Beach Tournament in Ocean City, Md. Clark, a sophomore English major, won the Single Dramatic Interpretation of Literature. Three additional members won a total of eight individual speaking and debate awards.

Management students get up-close look at supply chain field

Supply Chain Management Management students studying supply chain management recently attended the Congress for Progress 36 Conference in Harrisburg, which offered attendees the opportunity to listen and learn from experts in the field, covering topics such as inventory management, manufacturing flows, “green” purchasing, and value stream mapping. Students networked with professionals during the luncheon. Coordinated by Christian and John Grandzol, management faculty, this was the third consecutive year BU had the largest student presence at this conference. Recognition of our Supply Chain Management Career Concentration and career opportunities for students continue to grow as a result.

Immediately following the conference, the group toured the Exel Distribution Center in nearby Palmyra. This facility is the exclusive packager and distributor of Hershey’s chocolate. Students heard about and then witnessed first-hand the capital investment, human resource management, and technology required to operate a facility that processes more than 200,000 pallets of Hershey’s candy per year to retail customers all over the world. The tour was led by 2011 BU graduate Joe Bertuola, now working as a facility supervisor.

Professor talks Marcellus Shale drilling

Jeff Brunskill of Envionmental, Geographical and Geological Sciences appeared on WKOK's On the Mark on March 21 to talk about a series of programs at Bloomsburg University, exploring the social, economic and environmental impacts of drilling for natural gas in the Marcellus Shale. The series is called “Natural Gas Extraction in Marcellus Shale: Evaluating the Impacts.”

Campus Alert: Sunday, March 25

A female student presented herself at the Bloomsburg Hospital today (Sunday, March 25) at about 2 p.m. She reports she was sexually assaulted at approximately 1:30 a.m. today In Northumberland Hall. No further information is available. If you feel threatened or uncomfortable about a situation do not hesitate to notify police. The university recommends students walk in groups and keep a cell phone readily accessible. For your safety, there are emergency call boxes available throughout campus. If you are in town and need help call 911. This campus alert is issued in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police and Crime Statistics Act of 1990.

Campus Alert: Sunday, March 4

Bloomsburg Town Police report a robbery occurred at approximately 5:30 a.m. today (March 4) near the green lot. A male student walking near the green lot stopped to assist a female who claimed she got into an argument with her boyfriend and threw her phone over the parking lot fence into a wooded area. She asked the victim to help her find the phone. When the victim walked into the woods, he was jumped by several white males and black males who punched and kicked him and robbed him of $20. The female was described as a black woman who was wearing a blue shirt, blue jeans and white sneakers. All male assailants were wearing dark clothes. After robbing the victim, the assailants and female ran toward Lightstreet Road.

Bloomsburg Town Police are investigating the incident. Any information regarding the identity of this individual should be provided to the Bloomsburg Police at (570) 784-4155.
Always be vigilant of your surroundings and do not walk alone. If you feel threatened or uncomfortable about a situation do not hesitate to notify police. The university recommends students walk in groups and keep a cell phone readily accessible.

Also, consider carrying a whistle. While there are limitations to the effectiveness of a whistle against all threats, it could work well in a difficult situation as students would first blow into the whistle to attract help and then use a cell phone to call for help. For your safety, there are emergency call boxes available throughout campus. If you are in town and need help call 911. This campus alert is issued in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police and Crime Statistics Act of 1990.

Susan McDowell

Gift establishes McDowell Institute

A $2 million commitment to the Bloomsburg University Foundation supports an initiative to give teachers the tools and strategies they need to effectively teach all pupils in their classrooms. Philanthropist Susan McDowell’s gift — largest in the history of the BU Foundation — establishes the McDowell Institute for Teacher Excellence in Positive Behavior Support in the College of Education. The institute will help teachers identify pupils’ social, emotional and behavioral issues so all children may learn.

Greek Life takes on leadership challenge

Greek Olympics
Through the guidance of BU Quest, more than 150 fraternity brothers and sorority sisters recently participated in the annual BU Greek Olympics, where new members of 23 different Greek chapters completed numerous leadership training activities. The challenges were designed to enhance the communication and problem-solving skills of the students. Shawn Rosler ’00 ‘02M, Delta Kappa Epsilon alum, and Greta Rosler ’02, Chi Theta Pi alumna, kicked off the Olympics with a leadership presentation.

Forensics team showcases its talents

Speech and Debate (Forensics) Team BU’s Speech and Debate (Forensics) Team has finished strong in two recent speech and debate tournaments — fifth out of eight schools at the Collegiate Forensic Association’s annual winter tournament at the College of Charleston, S.C., and won nine individual awards at the Harold Cox Invitational Events Speech Tournament at Wilkes University.

In South Carolina, every team member brought home an award. They were: Dan Clark, second in Single Dramatic Interpretation of Literature; Mary Pellant, sixth in Persuasive Speaking; Erika Mohr, earned a sixth place Speaker Award in Parliamentary Debate; Joshua Hooks and Clark, fifth in Parliamentary Debate; as well as Pellant and Mohr, fourth in Parliamentary Debate.

In Wilkes-Barre, Pellant won Single Dramatic Interpretation of Literature and Impromptu Speaking; placed second in Best Overall Tournament Speaker and Prose Speaking; and fourth in Extemporaneous Speaking and Persuasive Speaking. Mohr was third in Extemporaneous Speaking, fourth in Best Overall Tournament Speaker and Single Dramatic Interpretation of Literature and fifth in Impromptu Speaking.

Pictured at Fort Sumter National Monument (L-R) Joshua Hooks, Dan Clark, Erika Mohr, Joe Wright, Mary Pellant and Neil Strine. Contact Strine, forensics director, for details about joining the team, which meets every Wednesday, 5 p.m., Bakeless 208. No experience necessary.

Performance artist visits campus

Al Letson
Al Letson, an accomplished playwright, performance poet, actor and public radio host, will present, “Bayard Rustin: The Untold story of a Civil and Gay Rights Pioneer” at 6 p.m., Monday, Feb. 27 at the Multicultural Center. Letson’s visit is part of BU’s Black History Month Speaker Series. Letson’s distinctive voice, insightful prose and unique vision have garnered national acclaim and inspired a growing number of fans and followers.

Faculty member shares Poland experience

Margaret O’Connor
Faculty member Margaret O’Connor will speak on “Teaching Entrepreneurship in Poland, 2011” Wednesday, Feb. 29, at 4:30 p.m. in the Student Services Center 004. The event is a part of BU’s Institute for Culture and Society. O’Connor is associate professor of business education and information and technology management. During her talk, she will share her perspective as an American professor abroad and the challenges she faced while teaching an entrepreneurship course at the University of Warsaw. Contact Christina Francis, associate professor of English, for more information. This lecture, part of the ICS lecture series, is open free to the public.

Upward Bound student receives scholarship

Dakota Milo Dakota Milo, a participant in BU’s TRiO Upward Bound, recently received a Horatio Alger Scholarship. Nationally, she is one of 50 recipients of the $5,000 award. The Horatio Alger Pennsylvania Scholarship provides assistance to students who have “exhibited integrity and perseverance in overcoming personal adversity and who aspire to pursue higher education.” Among the requirements, eligible students must have plans to pursue a bachelor’s degree, demonstrate financial need and participate in school-related and community activities. Milo is a senior at Berwick High School and has been a TRiO Upward Bound at participant for three years. BU’s TRiO Upward Bound program assists area high school students gain the skills and experiences necessary to succeed in a college environment. The program strives to help students improve academically, educates participants about college admission and financial aid procedures and offers year-round college-readiness preparation.

Innovation from inside the classroom

Electronics Engineering Technology
One of the main objectives of the BU’s Electronics Engineering Technology (EET) program is to provide the theoretical knowledge and hands-on experience in the state of art electronics engineering. Students are trained to think critically and thoroughly to innovate and provide solutions for real world electronics engineering problems. One of the important EET courses is the Capstone Senior Design Project. Its aim is to culminate the undergraduate experience, where knowledge gained in the classroom is applied to a major design project. The course was developed and supervised by Ghassan Ibrahim, associate professor of physics and engineering technology, to encourage EET students to be thinkers and problem solvers.

Huskies honor breast cancer survivors

Hooping for a Cure BU's athletic department hosted breast cancer survivors on Saturday, Feb. 11, as part of “Hooping for a Cure" before its game with West Chester. Hooping for a Cure is the PSAC's awareness and fundraising effort that is a part of the WBCA's Play 4Kay, which was formerly known as the WBCA Pink Zone. Hooping for a Cure

Play 4Kay is an opportunity for coaches and teams to raise breast cancer awareness and funds for research on the court, across campuses, in communities and beyond. Prior tip-of the game the Huskies introduced and honored breast cancer survivors and those who have lost loved ones to the disease. The Huskies also raffled off themed baskets raising nearly $300 for the PA Breast Cancer Coalition, which represents, supports and serves breast cancer survivors and their families through educational programming, legislative advocacy and breast cancer research grants.

Grandson of Mohandas Gandhi to visit BU

Arun Gandhi
Activist, diversity speaker and spiritual leader Arun Gandhi will be among several distinguished speakers and lecturers to visit campus this spring. Grandson of the legendary peace fighter and spiritual leader Mohandas Gandhi, Arun Gandhi will discuss his grandfather’s legacy and their kinship on Wednesday, Feb. 15, at 7 p.m. in Carver Hall's Gross Auditorium, as well as will speak on “Lessons Learned from my Grandfather: Non-Violence in a Violent World.” Arun Gandhi, founder of the M.K. Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence, renders a message of integrity, social harmony and peace.

He follows in the footsteps of his grandfather, sharing these lessons around the world. His first book, “A Patch of White,” published in 1949, explains the prejudice filling South Africa. He wrote two more books on poverty and politics in India. For details on this event, open free to the public, contact Madelyn Rodriguez, director of BU's Multicultural Center.

Zimmerman helping electric power industry

zimmerman_g Greg Zimmerman, Ph.D., associate professor of chemistry, has been studying aqueous salt solutions at high temperatures and pressures for many years, because of its extreme importance to the electric power generating industry. Specifically, he measures a property called the electrical conductivity which can be used to determine the species in solution as well as how fast these species travel in the high temperature water. While this technique is well over a hundred years old, the instruments required for these measurements at the extreme temperatures and pressures of interest are difficult to construct for several reasons.

Materials must be used that minimize corrosion of the instrument from the solutions; otherwise contamination will render the measurements useless. The instruments have therefore been constructed from platinum, gold, sapphire and diamond. Using a flow-design also minimizes corrosion, so that the solutions enter the hot-zone and are measured as quickly as possible. Leaks around the electrodes, which must be electrically insulated from each other, are the other huge obstacle in making these instruments. The cell with the electrodes is therefore made small. Zimmerman has either built or helped design most of the existing flow electrical conductance instruments in the world today.

National spokeswoman visits campus

Colloquium on Domestic Violence
A nationally known leader in the fight against domestic violence will deliver the keynote address at BU’s Colloquium on Domestic Violence on Thursday, Feb. 23, at 6 p.m. in Centennial Hall 218. Wanda Lucibello has more than 30 years of experience working with domestic violence victims. As chief of New York City’s Special Victims Division, Lucibello is in charge of the prosecutorial coordination of the Brooklyn Felony Domestic Violence Court. She has conducted woman’s groups in Zimbabwe, Botswana, Ireland, Mexico and South Africa, all reflecting on family violence. The event, free and open to the public, is sponsored by BU’s Institute of Human Rights and Social Justice.

Alumna credits BU for her career path

Jennifer Vest Accounting teacher Jennifer Vest didn't start out as an education major in college. But the Warrior Run High School teacher credits Bloomsburg University for providing her with the opportunity to excel in the most rewarding job she's ever had. "I was three classes from graduating and realized that I did not enjoy the corporate aspect of accounting ... I was thankful that Bloomsburg had business education, it transferred all of my credits and all I needed was my education credits, so it took me five years instead of four," Vest said of her transition to teaching. "It is the best decision I made, I never feel like I'm going to work."

Noted British scholar discusses playwork

Fraser Brown Fraser Brown, professor of playwork at Leeds Metropolitan University, is the next distinguished speaker to visit campus this spring. Brown will speak on “Children Without Play” on Wednesday, Feb. 22, at 6:30 p.m. in McCormick Center 1303. His presentation will include the impact of a playwork project on a group of children in a Romanian pediatric hospital and touch on recent work by the charity Aid for Romanian Children to alleviate poverty and disadvantage of gypsy children in Transylvania.

Author to discuss impact of slave trade

Thomas DeWolf Thomas DeWolf, author of Inheriting the Trade: a Northern Family Confronts Its Legacy as the Largest Slave Trading Dynasty in U.S. History, will be the latest distinguished speaker to visit campus this spring. DeWolf will read portions of his book and discuss the impact of slavery at 7:30 p.m., Monday, Feb. 20, in Kehr Union Multipurpose B. The University Bookstore will have DeWolf's book available for purchase at the event, and DeWolf will sign copies should it be desired.

Taking the blinders off

Podcast Spring semester has arrived, and flowers are about to bloom. Why is now an ideal time to start thinking about a minor? Robert Marande, dean of the College of Science and Technology, explains why it's important for students to expand their academic interests to effectively transition into other areas after graduation.

Campus Alert: Wednesday, Feb. 29

Bloomsburg University Police Department is investigating a burglary that occurred between 6 and 7 p.m., Wednesday (Feb. 29). The actor entered a first floor Mt. Olympus residence. Entry was made through an unlocked window. No one was home at the time of the incident. A number of items were reported missing from the residence.

Remember to lock all doors and windows. Do not allow strangers into your residence. Report any suspicious people or activities to BU Police Department at (570) 389-4168. This campus alert is issued in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police and Crime Statistics Act of 1990.

2011 Fall Semester

A new chapter unfolds with the New Year!

As a new semester officially begins Monday, Jan. 23, let's look back at a unique fall 2011 semester that saw the BU community survive a devastating flood, earthquake tremor and the rainest season on record for Central Pennsylvania, while maintaining a high level of academics, student research and volunteerism. Wonder what the spring may bring?

PASSHE response to 2012-13 proposed budget

PASSHE The following is a joint statement from Guido Pichini, chair of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education’s Board of Governors, and PASSHE Chancellor John C. Cavanaugh in response to Gov. Tom Corbett’s proposed 2012-13 state budget. The governor’s proposal would reduce funding to PASSHE by 20 percent, or more than $82 million.

“We fully recognize the financial challenges facing the Commonwealth. Governor Corbett was right in saying that education is a key to the state’s financial recovery. That is especially true of our graduates, over 80 percent of whom stay in Pennsylvania for their careers and as community and civic leaders. However, our joint goals are at risk as a result of the budget blueprint for the Commonwealth presented today, which provides only $2 million more than PASSHE received 24 years ago (1988-89). Since then, we've added 23,000 students."

New location brings new adventures

Campus Child Center With a new location, BU’s Campus Child Center preschool is enjoying student-driven learning centers such as block play, trains, computer, writing, discovery, creative arts, dramatic plays and a rice table. Since moving to Montour Hall in December, the preschool — led by Nicole Cappello — has taken advantage of its new home to allow students to have a choice in their learning, which increases their motivation and involvement. The child center will soon be working with Mary Katherine Duncan, professor of psychology, using the resources of the
Toy Library. The children will enjoy “interactive reading” which includes reading stories while using puppets, and acting out literary situations.

(L-R) Everett Chappell, Madalyn Kratzer, Ryan Derr, Larson Kocher, Tala Almalki, Zainah Alajmi, Bader Almalki, Seraphim Kramarz, Jack Talbot, Bjork Millard. Preschoolers not pictured: Cerick Austin, Teddy Petrovich, Emily Shapeero, and Jameson Lapos.

Get a closer look at sorority life

Greek Recruitment
Registration is now open for Panhellenic sorority recruitment. Women interested in joining one of the 10 Panhellenic sororities can get more information by visiting the recruitment table in the KUB main lobby (between the Information Desk and Husky Lounge) from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Women interested in participating in formal recruitment must be undergraduates enrolled at BU for the spring 2012 semester.

They must also have a 2.5 cumulative grade point average and 12 completed credits. The recruitment calendar for all Greek organizations will be updated regularly.

Promote democracy and diplomacy

Model Organization of American States BU’s Model Organization of American States (MOAS) delegation will hold an information meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 1, at 4 p.m. in Student Services Center 140. The Organization of American States is a sub-regional intergovernmental organization similar to the United Nations that promotes democracy and diplomacy throughout the Americas. Students who unable to attend the meeting are invited to contact Ryan Geiger for more information about the group.

Discover the splendors of Russia this summer

An Information session for BU’s Russia Summer Study Abroad program will be held Monday, Feb. 13, at 3 p.m. in Bakeless Center 316B. Program leaders will discuss the benefits of the four-week program and hand out scholarship applications, as well as answer any questions about this international opportunity.

Take your BU experience global by living the arts, immersing in the culture and studying the language, history and traditions of some of the most desired destinations in the world through summer study abroad. Still deciding? Let a few past study abroad students convince you why this international experience is a can't miss opportunity.

Campus Alert: For Monday, Jan. 30

Bloomsburg Police report an armed robbery and assault with a knife occurred at approximately 8:15 p.m. Monday, Jan. 30, on First Street, behind the Unimart in the 900 block of Lightstreet Road. The female victim was followed from Iron Street and robbed of her purse at knifepoint. She sustained a laceration to her leg. The suspect is described as a male of undetermined race, approximately 6 feet tall. He was wearing a dark hoodie and was armed with a knife. He fled in an unknown direction following the incident.

Bloomsburg Police advise there is no updated information as of Tuesday, Jan. 31, at 9 a.m.

If you have any information regarding this incident contact the Bloomsburg Police Department at (570) 784-4155. Students are reminded to walk in groups, especially at night, and stay out of dimly lit areas. A whistle can be useful to draw attention if you find yourself in a dangerous situation. This campus alert is issued in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police and Crime Statistics Act of 1990.

Johnson hits the 'reel' speaking circuit

Brian C. Johnson Brian C. Johnson, director of BU’s Frederick Douglass Institute for Academic Excellence and academic advisor for BU’s Act 101/EOP, brought his anti-bullying message, with a Hollywood spin, to Clarkson University (NY). Standing in the university’s Student Forum, Johnson gave some humor to a very serious issue Monday during his presentation, “Reel Big Bullies,” as part of the university’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day memorial events. Anti-bullying messages like Johnson’s have gained national attention in recent months, especially after two high school teens, Jamey Rodemeyer, 14, and Amanda Cummings, 15, were pushed to suicide by classmates’ torment and ridicule.A ‘reel’ look at diversity | Diversity gets ‘reel’

Huskies hockey stays perfect with two wins

Ice Hockey Club BU’s Ice Hockey Club remained undefeated with two wins earlier this month. The Huskies improved to 9-0-0 in the Delaware Valley Collegiate Hockey Conference American Division with a 4-3 overtime victory over Rutgers Camden and a 3-2 win over Shippensburg University. Zach Gower (two goals) and Andrew Carney (goal) started the scoring against Rutgers, while team captain, Chris Kocher, scored the game winner in overtime. Against Shippensburg, Gower (two) and defenseman, Bobby Lynch, scored for Bloomsburg. Next up is East Stroudsburg University on Saturday, Feb. 4, at noon at the Revolution Ice Center, 12 Old Boston Road, Pittson.

A bountiful year of generosity and support

Supervisory Roundtable
BU’s Supervisory Roundtable, which provides on-campus training programs and coordinates community services activities, recently donated $7,500 to several worthy causes. They included a BU Endowed Scholarship, three annual BU student scholarships, Camp HERO at Camp Victory, University Food Drive, Brighter Christmas Fund, Toys for Tots, and the local Children’s Museum. The roundtable’s effort was a direct reflection on the generosity and support of the university and neighboring community.

Toy Library uses resources to help community

Toy Library The BU Toy Library played a role in the flood recovery efforts of Magic Carpet Preschool and the Columbia County Child Development Center¹s Head Start Program. In addition to loaning hundreds of toys this past fall, the toy library (Mary Katherine Duncan, founder) received donations from the Psychology Association (Jennifer Johnson, advisor), the National Student Speech Hearing and Language Association (Pamela Smith, advisor), and a private donor to help refurnish the preschools and replace their damaged toys and books.

BU community loses one of its own

We regret to inform you of the passing of a member of our university community, Professor Steven Hebbard, who passed away yesterday in his home. Hebbard was an adjunct faculty member in our College of Business for most of the past decade, teaching courses in management, as well as business education and business information systems. BU students gained from his experiences in the Air Force, where he retired as a colonel, and as the owner of a local insurance agency. He will be missed. Funeral arrangements will be announced later this week. Please keep his family in your thoughts.

Setting the stage for a successful future

Three BU students recently attended Agency Day at ICC-Lowe, a pharmaceutical advertising agency in Parsippany, N.J., where they will complete academic internships this summer. ICC-Lowe recently received Agency of the Year award for best pharmaceutical advertising agency. BU's Office of Academic Internships and Community Outreach sponsored the day. Students were Shetia Richardson, a senior marketing major; Samantha Bishop, a junior marketing major; and Erin Mills, a junior art major.

Live...learn...study the world

Take your BU experience global by living the arts, immersing in the culture and studying the language, history and traditions of some of the most desired destinations in the world through summer study abroad. Still deciding? Let a few of our past study abroad students convince you why this international summer experience is a can't miss opportunity.

Videoconferencing comes to Writing Center

This fall, BU Writing Center consultants practiced using Wimba to conduct writing center sessions online. Commuting students or any student who wants to work with a consultant but cannot get to one of our locations will be able to reach us online through a link we will provide when students request an online appointment. When the Writing Center reopens for the spring semester, students will be able to see and speak with consultants and share their documents, usually without having to download any new software.
Intramural Sports

Two faculty to receive tenure in spring

Nancy Ryland, Ph.D., assistant professor of educational studies and secondary education, and Jessica Bentley-Sassaman, Ph.D., assistant professor of exceptionalities and program director of BU's ASL/English interpreting, have been awarded tenure effective this spring.

Find your quiet space (meditation) on campus

BU’s Kehr Union Building provides a dedicated meditation space for use by anyone wishing to contemplate in a quiet, simple space. The tranquil space espouses no spiritual, religious or moral doctrine. The meditation room, next to the Fireside Lounge, is intended to provide an environment where members of the university community can use contemplation, spiritual review, prayer, reflection or relaxation to lead to an inner connection and peace. The space is available during KUB operating hours. This room may not be reserved.

Campus Alert: For Monday, Jan. 30

Bloomsburg Police report an armed robbery and assault with a knife occurred at approximately 8:15 p.m. Monday, Jan. 30, on First Street, behind the Unimart in the 900 block of Lightstreet Road. The female victim was followed from Iron Street and robbed of her purse at knifepoint. She sustained a laceration to her leg. The suspect is described as a male of undetermined race, approximately 6 feet tall. He was wearing a dark hoodie and was armed with a knife. He fled in an unknown direction following the incident.

Bloomsburg Police advise there is no updated information as of Tuesday, Jan. 31, at 9 a.m.

If you have any information regarding this incident contact the Bloomsburg Police Department at (570) 784-4155. Students are reminded to walk in groups, especially at night, and stay out of dimly lit areas. A whistle can be useful to draw attention if you find yourself in a dangerous situation. This alert is issued in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police and Crime Statistics Act of 1990.

Bloomsburg University

Assistant deans bring wealth of experience

BU’s new assistant deans — Dennis Gehris, College of Business; James Krause, College of Education; and John Polhill, College of Science and Technology — bring decades of teaching experience to their new administrative positions. After earning his doctorate in business education from Temple University, Gehris began teaching at BU in 1985. Krause earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from BU and his doctorate from Temple University. He began teaching at BU in 1996. Polhill, who earned his doctorate in mathematics from the University of Virginia, began teaching at BU in 1999.

Time to turn trash into treasure

Trash to Treasure
BU will host its annual Trash to Treasure fundraising event on Saturday, Jan. 21, from 9 a.m. to noon, in the KUB Multicultural Center. Collected items for sale include computers, furniture, electronics and common household appliances. All proceeds benefit the Columbia County United Way. Tickets for the early bird sale, which will be held from 8 to 9 a.m., are available for $5. Call (570) 784-3134 for more information.

Landscape Architect
BU’s landmark Academic Quad was recently the main feature in Landscape Architect, which included serving as the main cover piece and an anchor four-age spread. Landscape Architect is considered the industry trade magazine for commercial landscaping companies nationwide.

Football an afterthought, BU pitches in

With a big game looming, Bloomsburg football players boarded the white team school bus for another tough workout Wednesday. This was about much more than football, though. In this flood-ravaged town in east-central Pennsylvania, the strapping Huskies have turned into a mobile cleanup crew. They’re lugging broken refrigerators, waterlogged carpets and just about anything else out of homes damaged from the historic flooding caused by the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee.

Johnson comments for national media

Brian C. Johnson
Brian C. Johnson, director of BU’s Frederick Douglass Institute for Academic Excellence and academic advisor for BU’s Act 101/EOP, was recently used as an expert source by The Huffington Post in a story about the impact fraternities and sororities have across campus and in college life, particularly in moving beyond conformity to achieve diversity.

Alum named CFO of the Year

Michael Gillespie
Michael R. Gillespie ’95, chief accounting officer for Hersha Hospitality Trust of Harrisburg, was named a Central PA CFO of the Year for 2011 during a recognition ceremony on June 1. The Central Penn Business Journal award program honors financial executives who contribute to the success of the region’s economic growth and stability. A graduate of BU’s College of Business, Gillespie holds his bachelor’s degree in business administration, accounting.
 
He was selected among four nominees to receive the “Growth Specialist Award” by an independent panel of judges based on his career achievements, the impact of his contributions to his company and leadership in other areas. When Gillespie began with Hersha six years ago, the company had 27 hotels, total assets of $256 million and a market capitalization of roughly $100 million. Today, the company boasts 77 hotels, assets of $1.5 billion and a market capitalization in excess of $1 billion.

Prof on Australia media

Scott Lowe Scott Lowe, professor of philosophy, was recently interviewed by the Philosopher’s Zone on Australia’s ABC Radio National on why Ebenezer Scrooge is not a morally bad person as most people think. In actuality, Lowe says Scrooge is quite the man of ethical principal.

Lowe on ABC Radio | The Washington Post

Educating for change

Lisa Lapina
Lisa Lapina, who researched the effects of poverty this summer on the education of at-risk children in Zambia, Africa, for her independent honors research project, was recently featured in the PSEA’s publication Voice for Education in December 2010.

Lisa’s summer blog | PSEA Feature

BU explores hybrid college

Jim Hollister Jim Hollister, assistant vice president of external relations, was a featured guest of WKOK’s (News Radio 1070) Leaders and Lawmakers on Aug. 21, hosted by Mark Lawrence. Hollister discussed the efforts BU is taking to explore in bringing a hybrid form of college to Sunbury, Northumberland County. Listen to the Show

Faculty discuss Gulf oil spill

Cindy Venn, associate professor of geography and geosciences, and Tom Klinger, professor of biology and allied health sciences, were featured on WKOK’s (News Radio 1070) Roundtable discussion on Aug. 1, hosted by Mark Lawrence. Venn and Klinger, along with Julie Ambler, of Millersville University, discussed the environmental impact of the Gulf oil spill.

Listen to the Show | Venn on Leaders and Lawmakers

An architect of success

Jerry Wolman
Shenandoah native Jerry Wolman, former owner of the Philadelphia Eagles and Philadelphia Flyers, shared his rags-to-riches story Thursday, July 29, at BU with high school students in TRiO Upward Bound’s summer program. Wolman concluded his visit with an extended Q&A discussion before signing autographs, taking photos, even exchanging e-mail addresses.

Photo gallery | Podcast

Prof an expert to BBC

Leo Barrile Leo Barrile, professor of sociology, social work and criminology, is among the featured criminology experts in a BBC News article on the “Barefoot Bandit.” Barrile explains why this elusive teenager, who was hunted by police in the Bahamas after allegedly stealing a plane and flying it from Indiana, may have committed the reported string of suspected thefts of aircraft, boats and cars.

 

Military Appreciation Day at BU

Military Appreciation Day See WBRE’s coverage of BU’s inaugural Military Appreciation Day on April 14 that included fun activities, such a wings eating contest and tug-of-war, at the Lycoming Hall and Schuylkill Hall lawns. Several war veterans, including an Iraq War Purple Heart recipient and Vietnam War bomber pilot, described their experiences in combat.

BU research featured on the AP Newswire

The type of stretching that an athlete does prior to an athletic endeavor is important to improving performance and preventing injury. Static stretching (the traditional 30 second hold variety) has long been the standard activity performed prior to athletic events. However, more current research has demonstrated that dynamic stretching may be the better way to prepare the athlete for competition.

Faculty featured in Washington Post

Neil Strine Harry C. “Neil” Strine, associate professor of political science, was featured in a story on celebrity politics in The Washington Post on Sunday, April 24, where Strine reflected on the increasing number of celebrities testifying before Congress. See what Strine said about how effective celebrities can be?

Strine in The Washington Post

Professor's book embarks on blog tour

Karl Kapp, professor of instructional technology, completed a 30-day blog tour for his new book, "Learning in 3-D: Adding a New Dimension to Enterprise Learning and Collaboration," which explains the educational use of avatars and the 3-D virtual world.