Dr. Faith Warner

Dr. Faith Warner

Ph.D. Syracuse University
Graduate Certificate in Women's Studies
M.A. Syracuse University
B.A. Bloomsburg University

email: fwarner@bloomu.edu

Interests:
Feminist and advocacy anthropology, narrative theory, ethnicity and transnationalism, medical anthropology, refugees, migrant farmworkers, Q'eqchi and K'iche' Maya and Mesoamerica.

What interested you in Anthropology?
"Two life experiences in particular contributed to my becoming a cultural anthropologist. First, I cannot remember when or why my fascination with Mexico and Central America first germinated, as it was something that developed when I was a small child, before I even entered school. But, the key event in my life was when I studied in Mexico City for a year as a Rotarian exchange student while in high school. That year, my fascination matured into a lasting love for the peoples and cultures of Mexico. The second major experience that contributed to my choosing anthropology was my childhood exposure to a violent world, including Viet Nam, the Cold War, and later, the violence in Central America. Over the years, I have transformed my childhood anxieties over human violence into a research question and advocacy issue that still guides my scholarly ethos and actions: Under what conditions do humans behave with such violence toward one another and can such aggression be predicted and prevented? I pursued this research question at Syracuse University where I gained my Masters and Doctorate degrees in Anthropology, with a graduate certificate in Women’s Studies. I first looked at how Salvadoran refugee women utilized the power of motherhood and the testimonio as a means of social protest against the atrocities of war. Following that, I received a Fulbright Robles Garcia grant to study gender and ethnolinguistic differences in adaptation, traumatic stress, and social support networks in a Guatemalan refugee camp in Campeche, Mexico. There, I worked with Mayan peoples, including the Q’eqchi’, K’iche’, Mam, and K’anjobal. Finally, my love for Mexico today is much more than a scholarly interest, as I am now mother to two bi-national Mexican-American sons and in effect have made anthropology much more than my occupation. Today, my daily life is a continuous cultural encounter and anthropology has become my lifestyle. It therefore gives me great satisfaction to introduce Bloomsburg University students to a culture that I value and identify with as much as my own."