Mentoring part of the pack

By Andrea O'Neill '06

The internship program not only offers Geisinger the chance to see which students may be a good fit for the program, but it allows Huskies to have an edge when it comes time to move from student to professional. For Ken Roszel '81/'94M, it is a win-win. Not only does he get to guide students as their supervisor, but he also gets to stay in close contact with his alma mater and assist other Huskies in their first career move

After three years in the army as an X-ray technologist, Ken Roszel ‘81/’94M joined a little-known rural hospital in Danville called The George F. Geisinger Memorial Hospital. At the time, the hospital had a school for aspiring radiologic technologists, and Roszel found a love of teaching his craft. So, with his GI bill in hand, Roszel enrolled in Bloomsburg University’s BS program in Medical Imaging with an emphasis on education.

“At the time, you could go to a hospital-based school for a certificate and be set for life as a registered technologist,” said Roszel.

Alumnus Ken Roszel taking an x-ray while serving in the U.S. Army

Sometimes, timing is everything. Around the time Roszel graduated from Bloom, the Geisinger school hired him as a clinical coordinator to assist the program director and oversee the clinic. He coordinated clinical schedules for students and taught several classes. Roszel enjoyed the educational aspect of his role so much that he returned to BU for his MS in Instructional Technology.

“It Looked interesting, and I wanted to know more about education,” said Roszel. “I needed more, but I didn’t know what ‘more’ was. I never thought I was Master’s material, but I liked what I heard and gave it a try.”

Not long after he received his M.S.I.T. degree, however, the rules that allowed one to become a certified technologist via a hospital program changed and a B.S. degree was now required. Geisinger’s program was one of many to close under the new requirements, and fortunately Roszel was hired by Geisinger Health Plan to oversee the newly created Member Education department.

“Having that degree saved me,” said Roszel. “Without it, I would not have been considered for the position with GHP.”

Alumnus Ken Roszel instructs medical imaging students from BU at Geisinger

It wasn’t long, however, that the closing of so many hospital-based programs across the country created a shortage of technologists. Geisinger reopened the school, and today provides BU medical imaging students the opportunity to apply and intern at the facility. The close proximity means that nearly all of the students are Huskies, and Roszel is able to continue his association with and support of Bloomsburg University by acting as the on-site supervisor for Medical Imaging interns and a speaker on campus.

“I see students enter the profession with very little knowledge or skill and over time see their confidence and knowledge growing to the point where I would trust any of my students to radiograph my wife,” explained Roszel, whose former student did indeed have his wife as a patient. “I see them all coming in as blank slates and leaving as seasoned technologists, and it gives me a lot of pride and a sense of accomplishment.”

The internship program not only offers Geisinger the chance to see which students may be a good fit for the program, but it allows Huskies to have an edge when it comes time to move from student to professional. For Roszel, it is a win-win. Not only does he get to guide students as their supervisor, but he also gets to stay in close contact with his alma mater and assist other Huskies in their first career move.

“I really cherish the fact that I can continue to be part of BU through this process of being an intern site supervisor,” concluded Roszel. “Not only did I receive my degrees there, but now continue to be part of the process even if I’m not on campus. I greatly appreciate that.”

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